Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: SPRING

  • 51.
    As every season seems best to us in its turn, so the coming in of spring is like the creation of Cosmos out of Chaos and the realization of the Golden Age.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 346, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, chaos, spring
  • 52.
    In short, as a snow-drift is formed where there is a lull in the wind, so, one would say, where there is a lull of truth, an institution springs up. But the truth blows right on over it, nevertheless, and at length blows it down.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Life Without Principle" (1863), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 480, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 53.
    Who shall describe the inexpressable tenderness and immortal life of the grim forest, where Nature, though it be midwinter, is ever in her spring, where the moss-grown and decaying trees are not old, but seem to enjoy a perpetual youth.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Ktaadn" (1848) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 89, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 54.
    We have ... a thirst unquenchable, to allay which he has not shown us the crystal springs. This thirst belongs to the immortality of Man.... It is no mere appreciation of the Beauty before us—but a wild effort to reach the Beauty above.
    (Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Poetic Principle," Sartain's (1850). Other-worldly beauty—Poe's first and enduring love.)
    More quotations from: Edgar Allan Poe, beauty
  • 55.
    To be a born American citizen seems a guarantee against pauperism; and this, perhaps, springs from the virtue of a vote.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Redburn (1849), ch. 41, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 4, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1969).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville
  • 56.
    Unfortunately there is nothing more inane than an Easter carol. It is a religious perversion of the activity of Spring in our blood.
    (Wallace Stevens (1879-1955), U.S. poet. Letter, April 23, 1916. Letters of Wallace Stevens, no. 202, ed. Holly Stevens (1967). To his future wife, Elsie Moll Kachel.)
    More quotations from: Wallace Stevens, spring
  • 57.
    Though I do not believe that a plant will spring up where no seed has been, I have great faith in a seed,—a, to me, equally mysterious origin for it.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Succession of Forest Trees" (1860), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 203, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 58.
    All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. To be natural is to be obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891).)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, poetry
  • 59.
    It is the essence of poetry to spring, like the rainbow daughter of Wonder, from the invisible, to abolish the past, and refuse all history.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Shakspeare; or, the Poet," Representative Men (1850).)
  • 60.
    It were as wise to cast a violet into a crucible that you might discover the formal principle of its colour and odour, as seek to transfuse from one language into another the creations of a poet. The plant must spring again from its seed, or it will bear no flower—and this is the burthen of the curse of Babel.
    (Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, published 1840).)
    More quotations from: Percy Bysshe Shelley, flower, spring
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