Quotations About / On: SPRING

  • 61.
    Fiddle-dee-dee! War, war, war. This war talk's spoiling all the fun at every party this spring. I get so bored I could scream. Besides, there isn't going to be any war.
    (Sidney Howard (1891-1939), U.S. screenwriter. Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh), Gone With The Wind, to the Tarleton twins (Fred Crane, George Reeves) (1939).)
  • 62.
    We may not all break the Ten Commandments, but we are certainly all capable of it. Within us lurks the breaker of all laws, ready to spring out at the first real opportunity.
    (Isadora Duncan (1878-1927), U.S. dancer. My Life, introduction (1927).)
    More quotations from: Isadora Duncan, spring
  • 63.
    I believe my ardour for invention springs from his loins. I can't say that the brassiere will ever take as great a place in history as the steamboat, but I did invent it.
    (Caresse Crosby (1892-1970), U.S. literary editor and inventor. As quoted in Feminine Ingenuity, ch. 12, by Anne L. MacDonald (1992). Said in the early 1900s. The inventor of the backless brassiere (under her earlier name, Mary Phelps Peabody) was citing her descendence from Robert Fulton (1765-1815), inventor of the steamboat, as a possible explanation for her ingenuity.)
    More quotations from: Caresse Crosby, history, believe
  • 64.
    The attraction of horror is a mental, or even an intellectual, excitement, but the fascination of the repulsive, so noticeable in contemporary writing, can spring openly from some rotted substance within our civilization ...
    (Ellen Glasgow (1873-1945), U.S. novelist. The Woman Within, ch. 21 (1954). Written in 1937.)
    More quotations from: Ellen Glasgow, spring
  • 65.
    The study of crime begins with the knowledge of oneself. All that you despise, all that you loathe, all that you reject, all that you condemn and seek to convert by punishment springs from you.
    (Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. "The Soul of Anaesthesia," The Air-Conditioned Nightmare (1945).)
    More quotations from: Henry Miller
  • 66.
    What is a farm but a mute gospel? The chaff and the wheat, weeds and plants, blight, rain, insects, sun—it is a sacred emblem from the first furrow of spring to the last stack which the snow of winter overtakes in the fields.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 5 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).)
  • 67.
    The wheels and springs of man are all set to the hypothesis of the permanence of nature. We are not built like a ship to be tossed, but like a house to stand.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 6 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, house, nature
  • 68.
    The Xanthus or Scamander is not a mere dry channel and bed of a mountain torrent, but fed by the ever-flowing springs of fame ... and I trust that I may be allowed to associate our muddy but much abused Concord River with the most famous in history.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 10, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 69.
    I hate Science. It denies a man's responsibility for his own deeds, abolishes the brotherhood that springs from God's fatherhood. It is a hectoring, dictating expertise, which makes the least lovable of the Church Fathers seem liberal by contrast. It is far easier for a Hitler or a Stalin to find a mock- scientific excuse for persecution than it was for Dominic to find a mock-Christian one.
    (Basil Bunting (1900-1985), British poet. letter, Jan. 1, 1947, to poet Louis Zukofsky. Quoted in The Poetry of Basil Bunting, ch. 6, by Victoria Forde (1991).)
    More quotations from: Basil Bunting, hate, god
  • 70.
    In short, as a snow-drift is formed where there is a lull in the wind, so, one would say, where there is a lull of truth, an institution springs up. But the truth blows right on over it, nevertheless, and at length blows it down.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Life Without Principle" (1863), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 480, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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