Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: STAR

  • 41.
    Our actions seem to have their lucky and unlucky stars, to which a great part of that blame and that commendation is due which is given to the actions themselves.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. repr. F.A. Stokes Co., New York (c. 1930). Moral Maxims and Reflections, no. 59 (1665-1678), trans. London (1706).)
    More quotations from: Duc De La Rochefoucauld, François
  • 42.
    One may understand the cosmos, but never the ego; the self is more distant than any star.
    (Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Logic of Elfland," Orthodoxy (1908).)
    More quotations from: Gilbert Keith Chesterton, star
  • 43.
    In philosophical inquiry, the human spirit, imitating the movement of the stars, must follow a curve which brings it back to its point of departure. To conclude is to close a circle.
    (Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Artificial Paradise, The Poem of Haschish, V. Moral (1860).)
    More quotations from: Charles Baudelaire
  • 44.
    As we looked up in silence to those distant lights, we were reminded that it was a rare imagination which first taught that the stars are worlds, and had conferred a great benefit on mankind.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 417, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 45.
    Son, brother, father, lover, friend. There is room in the heart for all the affections, as there is room in heaven for all the stars.
    (Victor Hugo (1802-1885), French poet, novelist, playwright, essayist. Trans. by Lorenzo O'Rourke. "Thoughts," Postscriptum de ma vie, in Victor Hugo's Intellectual Autobiography, Funk and Wagnalls (1907).)
  • 46.
    The light which puts out our eyes is darkness to us. Only that day dawns to which we are awake. There is more day to dawn. The sun is but a morning star.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Conclusion," Walden (1854).)
  • 47.
    I am not solitary whilst I read and write, though nobody is with me. But if a man would be alone, let him look at the stars.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 1 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, alone
  • 48.
    The roaring of the wind is my wife and the stars through the window pane are my children. The mighty abstract idea I have of beauty in all things stifles the more divided and minute domestic happiness.
    (John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Oct. 14-31, 1818, to his brother and sister-in-law. Letters of John Keats, no. 94, ed. Frederick Page (1954). George and Georgiana Keats, married in June of that year and recently settled in the United States, had urged the poet to think of starting a family.)
  • 49.
    And New York is the most beautiful city in the world? It is not far from it. No urban night is like the night there.... Squares after squares of flame, set up and cut into the aether. Here is our poetry, for we have pulled down the stars to our will.
    (Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. "Patria Mia," New Age (London, Sept. 18, 1912).)
  • 50.
    The shows of the day, the dewy morning, the rainbow, mountains, orchards in blossom, stars, moonlight, shadows in still water, and the like, if too eagerly hunted, become shows merely, and mock us with their unreality.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 3 (1836, revised and repr. 1849). Here Emerson articulates his vision of knowing as form of receptivity, rather than a grasping activity. Instead of saying "I've got it" when we understand something, Emerson would have us say "It has got me.")
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, rainbow, water
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