Quotations About / On: SUN

  • 31.
    The Sun, the hearth of affection and life, pours burning love on the delighted earth.
    (Arthur Rimbaud (1854-1891), French poet. "Soleil et Chair," sct. 1, Collected Poems, ed. Oliver Bernard (1962).)
    More quotations from: Arthur Rimbaud, sun, love, life
  • 32.
    Talk to me not of blasphemy, man; I'd strike the sun if it insulted me.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Moby-Dick (1851), ch. 36, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 6, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1988). Spoken by Captain Ahab.)
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  • 33.
    Foolery, sir, does walk about the orb like the sun, it shines everywhere.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Feste, in Twelfth Night, act 3, sc. 1, l. 38-9. To Cesario (Viola in disguise), varying the proverb, "the sun shines on all alike"; "foolery" is Feste's profession, but also means foolish behavior.)
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  • 34.
    We imagined that the sun shining on their bare heads had stamped a liberal and public character on their most private thoughts.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 226, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 35.
    A great cause of the night is lack of the sun.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Corin, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 28. The shepherd's homespun philosophy.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, sun, night
  • 36.
    We make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars, as if we were villains on necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edmund, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 2, l. 120-2. "On" means by.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, moon, sun
  • 37.
    Really to see the sun rise or go down every day, so to relate ourselves to a universal fact, would preserve us sane forever.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Life Without Principle" (1863), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, pp. 472-473, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, forever, sun
  • 38.
    "Dark times" is what they call it in Norway when the sun remains below the horizon all day long: the temperature falls slowly but surely at such times.—A nice metaphor for all those thinkers for whom the sun of mankind's future has temporarily disappeared.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 638, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). The Wanderer and His Shadow, aphorism 191, "Dark Times," (1880).)
  • 39.
    [Man's] life consists in a relation with all things: stone, earth, trees, flowers, water, insects, fishes, birds, creatures, sun, rainbow, children, women, other men. But his greatest and final relation is with the sun.
    (D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. First published by Centaur Press (Philadelphia, 1925). "Aristocracy," Reflections on the Death of a Porcupine, M. Secker (1934).)
  • 40.
    To be together again, after so long, who love the sunny wind, the windy sun, in the sun, in the wind, that is perhaps something, perhaps something.
    (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First published in 1953. Sam, in Watt, p. 163, Grove Press (1959).)
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