Quotations About / On: SUN

  • 51.
    ... a country encapsulates our childhood and those lanes, byres, fields, flowers, insects, suns, moons and stars are forever reoccurring.
    (Edna O'Brien (b. c. 1932), Irish author; relocated to England. Mother Ireland, ch. 7 (1976).)
    More quotations from: Edna O'Brien, childhood, forever
  • 52.
    The atom bombs are piling up in the factories, the police are prowling through the cities, the lies are streaming from the loudspeakers, but the earth is still going round the sun.
    (George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. "Thoughts on the Common Toad," Shooting an Elephant (1950).)
    More quotations from: George Orwell, sun
  • 53.
    It is an hypothesis that the sun will rise tomorrow: and this means that we do not know whether it will rise.
    (Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), Austrian-British philosopher. Trans. by D.F. Pears and B.F. McGuinness, Routledge and Kegan Paul (1961). Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, 6.36311.)
    More quotations from: Ludwig Wittgenstein, tomorrow, sun
  • 54.
    Tragedy is always a mistake; and the loneliness of the deepest thinker, the widest lover, ceases to be pathetic to us so soon as the sun is high enough above the mountains.
    (Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. quoted in Margaret Fuller Ossoli, p. 289, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston (1898).)
    More quotations from: Margaret Fuller, sun
  • 55.
    A man willing to work, and unable to find work, is perhaps the saddest sight that fortune's inequality exhibits under this sun.
    (Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), Scottish essayist and historian. Chartism, ch. 4 (1839).)
    More quotations from: Thomas Carlyle, work, sun
  • 56.
    The sun of a prince's good graces resembles that in the skies in that it shines most kindly upon the blackest people.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Notebooks and Diaries (1811-1816).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, sun, people
  • 57.
    The sun, the moon and the stars would have disappeared long ago ... had they happened to be within the reach of predatory human hands.
    (Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), British psychologist. The Dance of Life, ch. 7 (1923).)
    More quotations from: Havelock Ellis, moon, sun
  • 58.
    The best sun we have is made of Newcastle coal, and I am determined never to reckon upon any other.
    (Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Letter, June 15, 1768. Correspondence, vol. 10, Yale edition (1937-1983).)
    More quotations from: Horace Walpole, sun
  • 59.
    There are only two forces that can carry light to all the corners of the globe ... the sun in the heavens and the Associated Press down here.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Speech, September 18, 1906, to Associated Press, New York City. "Spelling and Pictures," Mark Twain's Speeches, ed. Albert Bigelow Paine (1923).)
  • 60.
    There is no gilding of setting sun or glamor of poetry to light up the ferocious and endless toil of the farmers' wives.
    (Hamlin Garland (1860-1940), U.S. author. "Melons and Early Frost," Boy Life on the Prairie (1899).)
    More quotations from: Hamlin Garland, poetry, sun, light
[Hata Bildir]