Quotations About / On: SUN

  • 51.
    It is an hypothesis that the sun will rise tomorrow: and this means that we do not know whether it will rise.
    (Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), Austrian-British philosopher. Trans. by D.F. Pears and B.F. McGuinness, Routledge and Kegan Paul (1961). Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, 6.36311.)
    More quotations from: Ludwig Wittgenstein, tomorrow, sun
  • 52.
    Tragedy is always a mistake; and the loneliness of the deepest thinker, the widest lover, ceases to be pathetic to us so soon as the sun is high enough above the mountains.
    (Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. quoted in Margaret Fuller Ossoli, p. 289, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston (1898).)
    More quotations from: Margaret Fuller, sun
  • 53.
    A man willing to work, and unable to find work, is perhaps the saddest sight that fortune's inequality exhibits under this sun.
    (Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), Scottish essayist and historian. Chartism, ch. 4 (1839).)
    More quotations from: Thomas Carlyle, work, sun
  • 54.
    The sun of a prince's good graces resembles that in the skies in that it shines most kindly upon the blackest people.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Notebooks and Diaries (1811-1816).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, sun, people
  • 55.
    The sun, the moon and the stars would have disappeared long ago ... had they happened to be within the reach of predatory human hands.
    (Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), British psychologist. The Dance of Life, ch. 7 (1923).)
    More quotations from: Havelock Ellis, moon, sun
  • 56.
    The best sun we have is made of Newcastle coal, and I am determined never to reckon upon any other.
    (Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Letter, June 15, 1768. Correspondence, vol. 10, Yale edition (1937-1983).)
    More quotations from: Horace Walpole, sun
  • 57.
    There are only two forces that can carry light to all the corners of the globe ... the sun in the heavens and the Associated Press down here.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Speech, September 18, 1906, to Associated Press, New York City. "Spelling and Pictures," Mark Twain's Speeches, ed. Albert Bigelow Paine (1923).)
  • 58.
    There is no gilding of setting sun or glamor of poetry to light up the ferocious and endless toil of the farmers' wives.
    (Hamlin Garland (1860-1940), U.S. author. "Melons and Early Frost," Boy Life on the Prairie (1899).)
    More quotations from: Hamlin Garland, poetry, sun, light
  • 59.
    That the sun will not rise to-morrow is no less intelligible a proposition, and implies no more contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise.
    (David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. Enquiries Concerning the Human Understanding and Concerning the Principles of Morals, sect. 4 ("Sceptical Doubts Concerning the Operations of the Understanding"), part 1, p. 25, ed. L. Selby-Bigge, M.A., London, Oxford University Press (1902). From "An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding.")
    More quotations from: David Hume, sun
  • 60.
    I recoil, overcome with the glory of my rosy hue and the knowledge that I, a mere cock, have made the sun rise.
    (Edmond Rostand (1868-1918), French poet, playwright. Chantecler, in The Chantecler, act 2, sc. 3 (1910).)
    More quotations from: Edmond Rostand, sun
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