Quotations About / On: SUN

  • 61.
    The best sun we have is made of Newcastle coal, and I am determined never to reckon upon any other.
    (Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Letter, June 15, 1768. Correspondence, vol. 10, Yale edition (1937-1983).)
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  • 62.
    There are only two forces that can carry light to all the corners of the globe ... the sun in the heavens and the Associated Press down here.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Speech, September 18, 1906, to Associated Press, New York City. "Spelling and Pictures," Mark Twain's Speeches, ed. Albert Bigelow Paine (1923).)
  • 63.
    There is no gilding of setting sun or glamor of poetry to light up the ferocious and endless toil of the farmers' wives.
    (Hamlin Garland (1860-1940), U.S. author. "Melons and Early Frost," Boy Life on the Prairie (1899).)
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  • 64.
    That the sun will not rise to-morrow is no less intelligible a proposition, and implies no more contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise.
    (David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. Enquiries Concerning the Human Understanding and Concerning the Principles of Morals, sect. 4 ("Sceptical Doubts Concerning the Operations of the Understanding"), part 1, p. 25, ed. L. Selby-Bigge, M.A., London, Oxford University Press (1902). From "An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding.")
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  • 65.
    I recoil, overcome with the glory of my rosy hue and the knowledge that I, a mere cock, have made the sun rise.
    (Edmond Rostand (1868-1918), French poet, playwright. Chantecler, in The Chantecler, act 2, sc. 3 (1910).)
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  • 66.
    Look not into the sun! Even the moon is too bright for your nocturnal eyes!
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 10, p. 196, selection 5[1], number 81, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Unpublished fragments dating to November 1882February 1883. Originally meant to be attributed to Zarathustra in Thus Spoke Zarathustra.)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, moon, sun
  • 67.
    A good man, though he will value his own countrymen, yet will think as highly of the worthy men of every nation under the sun.
    (Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Sir Charles Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 3, letter 29, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).)
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  • 68.
    Intuition, like the rays of the sun, acts only in an inflexibly straight line; it can guess right only on condition of never diverting its gaze; the freaks of chance disturb it.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in A Bachelor's Establishment, originally named Les Célibataires, first part was published as Les Deux Frères in La Presse (1841); included in the Comédie humaine first under the title Un Ménage de Garìon and finally as La Rabo.)
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  • 69.
    Up a lazy river by the old mill run, that lazy, lazy river in the noonday sun.
    (Sidney Arodin, U.S. songwriter. "Lazy River," Peer International Corp. (1931). Music composed by Hoagy Carmichael (1899-1981).)
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  • 70.
    There is no more unfortunate creature under the sun than a fetishist who yearns for a woman's shoe and has to settle for the whole woman.
    (Karl Kraus (1874-1936), Austrian writer. Trans. by Harry Zohn, originally published in Beim Wort genommen (1955). Half-Truths and One-and-a-Half Truths, University of Chicago Press (1990).)
    More quotations from: Karl Kraus, woman, sun
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