Quotations About / On: SUN

  • 61.
    "Dark times" is what they call it in Norway when the sun remains below the horizon all day long: the temperature falls slowly but surely at such times.—A nice metaphor for all those thinkers for whom the sun of mankind's future has temporarily disappeared.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 638, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). The Wanderer and His Shadow, aphorism 191, "Dark Times," (1880).)
  • 62.
    [Man's] life consists in a relation with all things: stone, earth, trees, flowers, water, insects, fishes, birds, creatures, sun, rainbow, children, women, other men. But his greatest and final relation is with the sun.
    (D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. First published by Centaur Press (Philadelphia, 1925). "Aristocracy," Reflections on the Death of a Porcupine, M. Secker (1934).)
  • 63.
    To be together again, after so long, who love the sunny wind, the windy sun, in the sun, in the wind, that is perhaps something, perhaps something.
    (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First published in 1953. Sam, in Watt, p. 163, Grove Press (1959).)
  • 64.
    Sun up, sun down, the days slip by and the sand lifted by the breeze will swallow my ship; but I will die here, as I am, standing in my little garden. What joy!
    (Simone Schwarz-Bart (b. 1938), Gaudeloupean author. The Bridge of Beyond, p. 249, Éditions du Seuil (1972).)
    More quotations from: Simone Schwarz-Bart, sun, joy
  • 65.
    To speak truly, few adult persons can see nature. Most persons do not see the sun. At least they have a very superficial seeing. The sun illuminates only the eye of the man, but shines into the eye and the heart of the child.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 1 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).)
  • 66.
    If I venture to displace ... the microscopical speck of dust... on the point of my finger,... I have done a deed which shakes the Moon in her path, which causes the Sun to be no longer the Sun, and which alters forever the destiny of multitudinous myriads of stars.
    (Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. Eureka, George P. Putnam (1848). Prefiguring the "butterfly effect.")
  • 67.
    You say there is no religion now. 'Tis like saying in rainy weather, there is no sun, when at that moment we are witnessing one of his superlative effects.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Worship," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, weather, sun
  • 68.
    Most events recorded in history are more remarkable than important, like eclipses of the sun and moon, by which all are attracted, but whose effects no one takes the trouble to calculate.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 134, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 69.
    To the eyes of a miser a guinea is more beautiful than the sun, and a bag worn with the use of money has more beautiful proportions than a vine filled with grapes.
    (William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. letter, Aug. 23, 1799. Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).)
    More quotations from: William Blake, beautiful, money, sun
  • 70.
    You cannot, in human experience, rush into the light. You have to go through the twilight into the broadening day before the noon comes and the full sun is upon the landscape.
    (Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. After dinner remarks in Paris (May 9, 1919). Wilson moderates his hopes and expectations while at the Paris peace conference.)
    More quotations from: Woodrow Wilson, sun, light
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