Quotations About / On: SUN

  • 61.
    Up a lazy river by the old mill run, that lazy, lazy river in the noonday sun.
    (Sidney Arodin, U.S. songwriter. "Lazy River," Peer International Corp. (1931). Music composed by Hoagy Carmichael (1899-1981).)
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  • 62.
    There is no more unfortunate creature under the sun than a fetishist who yearns for a woman's shoe and has to settle for the whole woman.
    (Karl Kraus (1874-1936), Austrian writer. Trans. by Harry Zohn, originally published in Beim Wort genommen (1955). Half-Truths and One-and-a-Half Truths, University of Chicago Press (1990).)
    More quotations from: Karl Kraus, woman, sun
  • 63.
    Nature made the day for exercise, work and seeing to one's business; and ... it provides us with a candle, which is to say the bright and joyous light of the sun.
    (François Rabelais (1494-1553), French author, evangelist. Panurge, in Third Book, ch. 15, p. 397, Pleiade edition (1995).)
  • 64.
    He had a whole heaven and horizon to himself, and the sun seemed to be journeying over his clearing only the livelong day.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Ktaadn" (1848) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, pp. 23-24, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, sun, heaven
  • 65.
    All we discover has been with us since the sun began to roll; and much we discover, is not worth the discovering.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 176, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Spoken by Babbalanja, the philosopher.)
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  • 66.
    When I could not see the light with my blind eyes, I blamed not my eyes, but the sun.
    (Jerome (c. 340-420), Roman church father. Epistulae, XXII, 30.)
    More quotations from: Jerome, sun, light
  • 67.
    The sun rarely shines in history, what with the dust and confusion; and when we meet with any cheering fact which implies the presence of this luminary, we excerpt and modernize it.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 163, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, sun, history
  • 68.
    It takes place ... always without permanent form, though ancient and familiar as the sun and moon, and as sure to come again.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, pp. 277-278, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, moon, sun
  • 69.
    We imagined that the sun shining on their bare heads had stamped a liberal and public character on their most private thoughts.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 226, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, sun
  • 70.
    Most events recorded in history are more remarkable than important, like eclipses of the sun and moon, by which all are attracted, but whose effects no one takes the trouble to calculate.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 134, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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