Quotations About / On: SYMPATHY

  • 1.
    Sympathy with joy intensifies the sum of sympathy in the world, sympathy with pain does not really diminish the amount of pain.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "The Soul of Man Under Socialism," Fortnightly Review.)
  • 2.
    No artist has ethical sympathies. An ethical sympathy in an artist is an unpardonable mannerism of style.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Picture of Dorian Gray, preface (1891).)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, sympathy
  • 3.
    When sympathy is being used to manipulate you retract it!
    (Life)
    More quotations from: Robert Peacock
  • 4.
    Women have no sympathy ... and my experience of women is almost as large as Europe.
    (Florence Nightingale (1820-1910), British nurse. letter, Dec. 13, 1861. Forever Yours, Florence Nightingale: Selected Letters, ch. 3 (1989). Refuting the argument that women had been more sympathetic to her work than men.)
  • 5.
    I answered my father's demands for sympathy with silence.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Tenth Selection, New York (1992).)
  • 6.
    Our sympathy is cold to the relation of distant misery.
    (Edward Gibbon (1737-1794), British historian. The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, ch. 49 (1776-1788).)
    More quotations from: Edward Gibbon, sympathy, cold
  • 7.
    Marriage must be a relation either of sympathy or of conquest.
    (George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Romola, ch. 48 (1863).)
  • 8.
    Children require guidance and sympathy far more than instruction.
    (Anne Sullivan, U.S. educator of the deaf and blind. The Last Word, ed. Carolyn Warner, ch. 16 (1992).)
    More quotations from: Anne Sullivan, sympathy, children
  • 9.
    Self-pity dries up our sympathy for others.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Ninth Selection, New York (1992).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, sympathy
  • 10.
    You love sack, and so do I; would you desire better sympathy?
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Mrs. Page, in The Merry Wives of Windsor, act 2, sc. 1, l. 8-10. Falstaff's way of making love to Mistress Page.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, sympathy, love
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