Quotations About / On: SYMPATHY

  • 41.
    ... while many people pride themselves, and with no exaggeration, on their ability to hear with sympathy of the downfall, sickness, and death of others, very few people seem to know what to do with a report of joy, happiness, good luck.
    (Jessamyn West (1902-1984), U.S. novelist. To See the Dream, part 2 (1956).)
  • 42.
    While it may not heighten our sympathy, wit widens our horizons by its flashes, revealing remote hidden affiliations and drawing laughter from far afield; humor, in contrast, strikes up fellow feeling, and though it does not leap so much across time and space, enriches our insight into the universal in familiar things, lending it a local habitation and a name.
    (Marie Collins Swabey. Comic Laughter, ch. 5, Yale University Press (1961).)
  • 43.
    In their sympathies, children feel nearer animals than adults. They frolic with animals, caress them, share with them feelings neither has words for. Have they ever stroked any adult with the love they bestow on a cat? Hugged any grownup with the ecstasy they feel when clasping a puppy?
    (Jessamyn West (1907-1984), U.S. novelist and autobiographer. The Life I Really Lived, part 1 (1979).)
    More quotations from: Jessamyn West, cat, children, love
  • 44.
    It is by a wise economy of nature that those who suffer without change, and whom no one can help, become uninteresting. Yet so it may happen that those who need sympathy the most often attract it the least.
    (F.H. (Francis Herbert) Bradley (1846-1924), British philosopher. Aphorisms, no. 22 (1930).)
  • 45.
    It is in the comprehension of the physically disabled, or disordered ... that we are behind our age.... sympathy as a fine art is backward in the growth of progress ...
    (Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1844-1911), U.S. novelist and short story writer. Chapters from a Life, ch. 11 (1897).)
    More quotations from: Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, sympathy
  • 46.
    It is in our faults and failings, not in our virtues, that we touch each other, and find sympathy.... It is in our follies that we are one.
    (Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927), British author. "On Vanity and Vanities," Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow (1889).)
    More quotations from: Jerome K Jerome, sympathy
  • 47.
    For the bright side of the painting I had a limited sympathy. My visions were of shipwreck and famine; of death or captivity among barbarian hordes; of a lifetime dragged out in sorrow and tears, upon some gray and desolate rock, in an ocean unapproachable and unknown.
    (Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. Pym, the narrator, in The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, ch. 2, Harper and Brothers (1838). Youthful fantasies of wild and extreme adventures.)
  • 48.
    Thus to him, to this schoolboy under the bending dome of day, is suggested that he and it proceed from one root; one is leaf and one is flower; relation, sympathy, stirring in every vein. And what is that root? Is not that the soul of his soul?
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Oration, August 31, 1837, delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Cambridge, Massachusetts. "The American Scholar," repr. In Emerson: Essays and Lectures, ed. Joel Porte (1983).)
  • 49.
    I am grown by sympathy a little eager and sentimental, but leave me alone, and I should relish every hour and what it brought me, the pot-luck of the day, as heartily as the oldest gossip in the bar-room.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Experience," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
  • 50.
    The pleasure of eloquence is in greatest part owing often to the stimulus of the occasion which produces it,—to the magic of sympathy, which exalts the feeling of each by radiating on him the feeling of all.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Art," Society and Solitude (1870).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, magic, sympathy
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