Quotations About / On: TEACHER

  • 41.
    The long discussions and painful arguments of adolescence and the fierce loyalties to teachers, heroes, and gurus during the teenage years are simply our children's struggles to ensure that the lifestyles and values they adopt are worthy of their allegiance.
    (Neil Kurshan (20th century), U.S. Rabbi. Raising Your Child to Be a Mensch, ch. 4 (1987).)
    More quotations from: Neil Kurshan, children
  • 42.
    I'm not a teacher: only a fellow-traveller of whom you asked the way. I pointed ahead—ahead of myself as well as you.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. Bishop of Chelsea, in Getting Married.)
    More quotations from: George Bernard Shaw, teacher
  • 43.
    Ethical and cultural desegregation. It is a contradiction in terms to scream race pride and equality while at the same time spurning Negro teachers and self-association.
    (Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. "Court Order Can't Make Races Mix," Orlando Sentinel (August 11, 1955).)
  • 44.
    Weakness is a better teacher than strength. Weakness must learn to understand the obstacles that strength brushes aside.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Twelfth Selection, New York (1993).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, strength, teacher
  • 45.
    I swear ... to hold my teacher in this art equal to my own parents; to make him partner in my livelihood; when he is in need of money to share mine with him; to consider his family as my own brothers and to teach them this art, if they want to learn it, without fee or indenture.
    (Hippocrates (c. 460-c. 370 B.C.), Greek physician. "The Hippocratic Oath.")
    More quotations from: Hippocrates, teacher, family, money
  • 46.
    There is ... in every child a painstaking teacher, so skilful that he obtains identical results in all children in all parts of the world. The only language men ever speak perfectly is the one they learn in babyhood, when no one can teach them anything!
    (Maria Montessori (1870-1952), Italian educationist. The Absorbent Mind, ch. 1 (1949).)
  • 47.
    What eleven- to thirteen-year-old boys fear is passivity of any kind. When they do act passively we can be fairly certain that it is an act of aggression designed to torment a parent or teacher. . . . Mischief at best, violence at worst is the boy's proclamation of masculinity.
    (Louise J. Kaplan (20th century), U.S. psychologist. Adolescence, ch. 7 (1984).)
    More quotations from: Louise J Kaplan, teacher, fear
  • 48.
    To a teacher of languages there comes a time when the world is but a place of many words and man appears a mere talking animal not much more wonderful than a parrot.
    (Joseph Conrad (1857-1924), Polish-born British novelist. the narrator, in Under Western Eyes, pt. 1, prologue (1911).)
  • 49.
    Like plowing, housework makes the ground ready for the germination of family life. The kids will not invite a teacher home if beer cans litter the living room. The family isn't likely to have breakfast together if somebody didn't remember to buy eggs, milk, or muffins. Housework maintains an orderly setting in which family life can flourish.
    (Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century), U.S. editor, writer. Family and Politics, ch. 7 (1983).)
  • 50.
    A long time ago people often said, "Why did you become a teacher?" Well, that was about the only decent thing when I was growing up for a girl to be. If you became a secretary ... you got a hard name.
    (Knowles Witcher Teel (b. c. 1906), U.S. schoolteacher. As quoted in Hill Country Teacher, ch. 2, by Diane Manning (1990). Teel taught in Texas from 1924 until her retirement in 1972; she was rare among teachers of her generation in that she continued working despite marriage and motherhood.)
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