Quotations About / On: TOGETHER

  • 61.
    We must indeed all hang together, or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately.
    (Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Remark, July 4, 1776, at the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Quoted in Ben Franklin Laughing, P.M. Zall (1980). Replying to John Hancock's remark that the revolutionaries should be unanimous in their action.)
    More quotations from: Benjamin Franklin, together
  • 62.
    To say the truth, reason and love keep little company together nowadays.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bottom, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 3, sc. 1, l. 143-4. Amazed that Titania makes love to him.)
  • 63.
    Strangers used to gather together at the cinema and sit together in the dark, like Ancient Greeks participating in the mysteries, dreaming the same dream in unison.
    (Angela Carter (1940-1992), British postmodern novelist. repr. Vintage (1992). Expletives Deleted, review of Robert Coover, A Night at the Movies, The Guardian (1987).)
    More quotations from: Angela Carter, together, dream, dark
  • 64.
    It was strange: two personalities coming together can create a third, with each being different, yet together making up one they are surprised at separately.
    (Alexander Theroux (b. 1940), U.S. novelist, poet, essayist. An Adultery, pt. 1, ch. 14, New York, Simon & Schuster (1987).)
    More quotations from: Alexander Theroux, together
  • 65.
    Chains do not hold a marriage together. It is threads, hundreds of tiny threads which sew people together through the years. That is what makes a marriage last—more than passion or even sex!
    (Simone Signoret (b. 1921), French film actor. Daily Mail (London, July 4, 1978).)
  • 66.
    Minds do not act together in public; they simply stick together; and when their private activities are resumed, they fly apart again.
    (Frank Moore Colby (1865-1925), U.S. editor, essayist. "Simple Simon," vol. 1, The Colby Essays (1926).)
    More quotations from: Frank Moore Colby, together, fly
  • 67.
    To love one child and to love all children, whether living or dead—somewhere these two loves come together. To love a no-good but humble punk and to love an honest man who believes himself to be an honest man—somewhere these, too, come together.
    (Marguerite Duras (b. 1914), French author, filmmaker. interview, repr. In Outside: Selected Writings (1984). "The Path of Joyful Despair," Le Monde (Paris, 1977).)
  • 68.
    Children and old people and the parents in between should be able to live together, in order to learn how to die with grace, together. And I fear that this is purely utopian fantasy ...
    (M.F.K. Fisher (1908-1992), U.S. culinary writer and autobiographer. Sister Age, Afterword (1983).)
  • 69.
    ... living in England does not free the American the way living in France frees him because the french [sic] and the American do not have the sense of going on together, from the beginning they know that there is no going on together no past present and future ...
    (Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author and patron of the arts; relocated to France. "An American and France," (1936). Born, raised, and educated in America, Stein settled in Paris, where she built her reputation as an innovative writer and patron of young artists and avant-garde art.)
    More quotations from: Gertrude Stein, together, future
  • 70.
    Lions, wolves, and vultures don't live together in herds, droves or flocks. Of all animals of prey, man is the only sociable one. Every one of us preys upon his neighbour, and yet we herd together.
    (John Gay (1685-1732), British dramatist. Lockit, in The Beggar's Opera, act 3, sc. 2.)
    More quotations from: John Gay, together
[Hata Bildir]