Quotations About / On: TOGETHER

  • 71.
    Do you think your mother and I should have lived comfortably so long together, if ever we had been married? Baggage!
    (John Gay (1685-1732), British dramatist, poet. Peachum, in The Beggar's Opera, act 1, sc. 8 (1728), ed. F.W. Bateson (1934).)
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  • 72.
    Eagles commonly fly alone. They are crows, daws, and starlings that flock together.
    (John Webster (1580-1625), British dramatist. Ferdinand, in The Duchess of Malfi, act 5, sc. 2.)
    More quotations from: John Webster, fly, together, alone
  • 73.
    What men call social virtues, good fellowship, is commonly but the virtue of pigs in a litter, which lie close together to keep each other warm.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. journal entry, Oct. 23, 1852.)
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  • 74.
    They have seemed to be together, though absent; shook hands as over a vast; and embraced as it were from the ends of opposed winds.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Camillo, in The Winter's Tale, act 1, sc. 1, l. 29-31. Describing the long friendship of Leontes of Sicily and Polixenes of Bohemia.)
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  • 75.
    We should meet each morning, as from foreign countries, and spending the day together, should depart at night, as into foreign countries.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Manners," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, together, night
  • 76.
    Once kick the world, and the world and you will live together at a reasonably good understanding.
    (Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. Letter of Advice to a Young Poet (Dec. 1, 1720).)
    More quotations from: Jonathan Swift, together, world
  • 77.
    The right eloquence needs no bell to call the people together, and no constable to keep them.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Eloquence," Society and Solitude (1870).)
  • 78.
    One of the most striking signs of the decay of art is when we see its separate forms jumbled together.
    (Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749-1832), German poet, dramatist. Propyläen, introduction (1798). A periodical founded by Goethe which took its title from the gateway to the Acropolis of Athens.)
    More quotations from: Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe, together
  • 79.
    Transport of the mails, transport of the human voice, transport of flickering pictures—in this century as in others our highest accomplishments still have the single aim of bringing men together.
    (Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (1900-1944), French aviator, writer. Wind, Sand, and Stars, ch. 3, published in Terre des Hommes (1939).)
    More quotations from: Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, together
  • 80.
    Love does not consist in gazing at each other but in looking together in the same direction.
    (Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (1900-1944), French aviator, author. Wind, Sand, and Stars, ch. 8 (1939).)
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