Quotations About / On: TOMORROW

  • 21.
    I've no time now, but believe me as surely as the moon will set and the sun will rise I shall kill you tomorrow night. I shall kill you even if you hide in the deepest cave of the earth. At ten o'clock tomorrow night, I shall kill you.
    (R.C. Sherriff (1896-1975), British screenwriter. James Whale. Jack Griffin (Claude Rains), The Invisible Man, informationrming Kemp that he will pay him back for his betrayal (1933). Full name Robert Cedric Sherriff.)
  • 22.
    This is not Johnson's war. This is America's war. If I drop dead tomorrow, this war will still be with you.
    (Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908-1973), U.S. president. Lyndon Johnson's War, preface, p. vi, W.W. Norton (1989). On Vietnam.)
  • 23.
    Whatever is a reality today, whatever you touch and believe in and that seems real for you today, is going to be—like the reality of yesterday—an illusion tomorrow.
    (Luigi Pirandello (1867-1936), Italian author, playwright. The father, in Six Characters in Search of an Author, act 3 (1921).)
  • 24.
    The only limit to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today. Let us move forward with strong and active faith.
    (Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945), U.S. president. FDR Speaks authorized edition of speeches, 1933-1945 (recordings of Franklin Roosevelt's public addresses), side 12, undelivered address, Jefferson Day, given here by FDR, Jr. (April 13, 1945), ed. Henry Steele Commager, Introduction by Eleanor Roosevelt, Washington Records, Inc. (1960). This was FDR's last appeal for Americans to remain united in pursuit of peace as they had remained united in search of victory.)
  • 25.
    How unreliable is the woman caught being faithful! Today she is faithful to you, tomorrow to another.
    (Karl Kraus (1874-1936), Austrian writer. Trans. by Harry Zohn, originally published in Beim Wort genommen (1955). Half-Truths and One-and-a-Half Truths, University of Chicago Press (1990).)
    More quotations from: Karl Kraus, tomorrow, today, woman
  • 26.
    Which is better: to have Fun with Fungi or to have Idiocy with Ideology, to have Wars because of Words, to have Tomorrow's Misdeeds out of Yesterday's Miscreeds?
    (Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Culture and the Individual," Moksha: Writings on Psychedelics and the Visionary Experience (1931-1963), eds. Horowitz and Palmer (1977).)
  • 27.
    Travelling, gentlemen, is medieval, today we have means of communication, not to speak of tomorrow and the day after, means of communication that bring the world into our homes, to travel from one place to another is atavistic.
    (Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Homo faberEin Bericht, Suhrkamp (1957). Professor O., in Homo FaberA Report, p. 100, trans. by Michael Bullock (1977), Abelard-Schuman (1959).)
  • 28.
    Just as petals fall from drying garlands, which you can see aimlessly swimming in wine-bowls are we lovers, who now puff up our chests, but perhaps tomorrow the fateful day will shut us down.
    (Propertius Sextus (c. 50-16 B.C.), Roman elegist. Oxford Classical Text, II.15. 51-54.)
  • 29.
    We are playing with fire when we skip the years of three, four, and five to hurry children into being age six.... Every child has a right to his fifth year of life, his fourth year, his third year. He has a right to live each year with joy and self-fulfillment. No one should ever claim the power to make a child mortgage his today for the sake of tomorrow.
    (James L. Hymes, Jr. (20th century), U.S. child development specialist, author. Teaching the Child Under Six, ch. 2 (1968).)
  • 30.
    Superstition? Who can define the boundary line between the superstition of yesterday and the scientific fact of tomorrow?
    (Garrett Fort (1900-1945), U.S. screenwriter, and Lambert Hillyer. Prof. Von Helsing (Edward Van Sloan), Dracula's Daughter, reacting to his friend Garth's disbelief in his story of vampires (1936). the character's name is Von Helsing here, although it was Van Helsing in Dracula; story suggested by Oliver Jeffries. Based on a story by Bram Stoker.)
    More quotations from: Garrett Fort, yesterday, tomorrow
[Hata Bildir]