Quotations About / On: TOMORROW

  • 31.
    As unmarried business women we must constantly use our opportunities in business in such a way that we are prepared for the marriage which may be ours tomorrow.
    (Hortense Odlum (1892-?), U.S. businesswoman. A Woman's Place, ch. 16 (1939). Although highly successful as president of Bonwit Teller, a New York City women's store, Odlum retained a traditional social perspective. She had a wealthy husband, three sons who were partly grown when she took the presidency (which was her first job), a luxurious home, and household help.)
  • 32.
    What our children have to fear is not the cars on the highways of tomorrow but our own pleasure in calculating the most elegant parameters of their deaths.
    (J.G. (James Graham) Ballard (b. 1930), British novelist. The Atrocity Exhibition, ch. 8 (1970).)
  • 33.
    In the mountains of truth you will never climb in vain: either you will already get further up today or you will exercise your strength so that you can climb higher tomorrow.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 522, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Mixed Opinions and Maxims, aphorism 358, "Never in Vain," (1879).)
  • 34.
    I haven't eaten in three days. I didn't eat yesterday, I didn't eat today and I'm not going to eat tomorrow. That makes it three days!
    (S.J. Perelman, U.S. screenwriter, Arthur Sheekman, Will Johnstone, and Norman Z. McLeod. Chico Marx, Monkey Business, a complaint shipboard stowaway Chico makes to fellow stowaway Groucho Marx (1931). Groucho has no character name in the credits—he is listed as one of the "Stowaways.")
  • 35.
    The paradoxes of today are the prejudices of tomorrow, since the most benighted and the most deplorable prejudices have had their moment of novelty when fashion lent them its fragile grace.
    (Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. "Regrets, Reveries, Changing Skies," no. 5, Pleasures and Regrets (1896, trans. 1948).)
    More quotations from: Marcel Proust, tomorrow, today
  • 36.
    Do not put off your work until tomorrow and the day after. For the sluggish worker does not fill his barn, nor the one who puts off his work; industry aids work, but the man who puts off work always wrestles with disaster.
    (Hesiod (c. 8th century B.C.), Greek didactic poet. Works and Days, 410.)
    More quotations from: Hesiod, work, tomorrow
  • 37.
    Tara! Home. I'll go home, and I'll think of some way to get him back. After all, tomorrow is another day!
    (Sidney Howard (1891-1939), U.S. screenwriter. Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh), Gone With The Wind, immediately before the film's fade-out (1939).)
    More quotations from: Sidney Howard, home, tomorrow
  • 38.
    The savages set up gods to which they pray, and which they punish if one of their prayers is not answered.... That is what is happening at this moment.... Yesterday Kerensky; today Lenin and Trotsky; another tomorrow.
    (Victor Mikhailovich Chernov (1873-1972), Russian socialist revolutionary. speech, Nov. 28, 1917, Peasants' Congress, Petrograd. Quoted in John Reed, Ten Days that Shook the World, ch. 12 (1926).)
  • 39.
    The past is only the present become invisible and mute; and because it is invisible and mute, its memoried glances and its murmurs are infinitely precious. We are tomorrow's past.
    (Mary Webb (1881-1927), British author. Precious Bane, foreword (1924).)
    More quotations from: Mary Webb, tomorrow
  • 40.
    We are living in a demented world. And we know it. It would not come as a surprise to anyone if tomorrow the madness gave way to a frenzy which would leave our poor Europe in a state of distracted stupor, with engines still turning and flags streaming in the breeze, but with the spirit gone.
    (Johan Huizinga (1872-1945), Dutch historian. In the Shadow of Tomorrow, ch. 1 (1936). Written as the clouds of WW II gathered.)
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