Quotations About / On: TRAVEL

  • 31.
    A man may travel fast enough and earn his living on the road.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 324, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, travel
  • 32.
    Thus, far from the beaten highways and the dust and din of travel, we beheld the country privately, yet freely, and at our leisure.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 249, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, travel
  • 33.
    Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us, or we find it not.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Art," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 34.
    Traveling is a fool's paradise. Our first journeys discover to us the indifference of places.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Self-Reliance," Essays, First Series (1841).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • 35.
    I had rather have a fool to make me merry than experience to make me sad—and to travel for it too!
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 27-9. To Jaques, who has been defining his particular melancholy.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, travel, sad
  • 36.
    My soul travels on the smell of perfume like the souls of other men on music.
    (Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Little Poems in Prose (Paris Spleen), "A Hemisphere in a Head of Hair," (1857).)
    More quotations from: Charles Baudelaire, music
  • 37.
    To travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive.
    (Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Virginibus Puerisque, "El Dorado," (1881).)
    More quotations from: Robert Louis Stevenson, travel
  • 38.
    He may travel who can subsist on the wild fruits and game of the most cultivated country.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 324, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, travel
  • 39.
    Bachelors alone can travel freely, and without any twinges of their consciences touching desertion of the fire-side.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids" (1855), The Piazza Tales and Other Prose Pieces 1839-1860, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 9, eds. Harrison Hayford, Alma A. MacDougall, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1987).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, travel, fire, alone
  • 40.
    I was born and raised in a neighborhood called Noah's Ark. If you didn't travel in pairs, you just didn't travel.
    (Stanley Shapiro (1925-1990), screenwriter, and Maurice Richlin (d. 1990). Lieutenant Holden (Tony Curtis), Operation Petticoat (1959).)
    More quotations from: Stanley Shapiro, travel
[Hata Bildir]