Post more comments

Quotations About / On: TRAVEL

  • 51.
    It would be nice to travel if you knew where you were going and where you would live at the end or do we ever know, do we ever live where we live, we're always in other places, lost, like sheep.
    (Janet Frame (b. 1924), New Zealand novelist, poet. "The Day of the Sheep," You Are Now Entering the Human Heart (1983).)
    More quotations from: Janet Frame, travel, lost
  • 52.
    Is it true that one travels in order to know mankind? It is easier to get to know other people at home, but abroad one gets to know oneself.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. "Into a Parisian Album," Poems (1836).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, home, people
  • 53.
    Hope, deceitful though it be, is at least of this good use to us—that while we are traveling through this life, it conducts us by an easier and more pleasant way to our journey's end.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. repr. F.A. Stokes Co., New York (c. 1930). Moral Maxims and Reflections, no. 169 (1665-1678), trans. London (1706).)
  • 54.
    I have found out that there ain't no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Tom Sawyer Abroad, ch. 11 (1894).)
  • 55.
    Life, as the most ancient of all metaphors insists, is a journey; and the travel book, in its deceptive simulation of the journey's fits and starts, rehearses life's own fragmentation. More even than the novel, it embraces the contingency of things.
    (Jonathan Raban (b. 1942), British author, critic. For Love and Money, pt. 5 (1987).)
  • 56.
    My second husband was an American. We traveled all over the world and everywhere we went he would say to people, "I am an American. I am an American." They finally shot him in one of those Eastern countries.
    (John Paxton (1911-1985), U.S. screenwriter, and Stanley Kramer. Woman at party, On the Beach, talking to the American Capt. Towers (1959). From the novel by Nevil Shute.)
    More quotations from: John Paxton, husband, people, world
  • 57.
    Of all possible debauches, traveling is the greatest that I know; that's the one they invented when they got tired of all the others.
    (Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Letter, April 9, 1851, to Ernest Chevalier, trans. by William G. Allen. Correspondance, II, p. 309, Conard (1926-1933).)
    More quotations from: Gustave Flaubert
  • 58.
    What is there in Rome for me to see that others have not seen before me? What is there for me to touch that others have not touched? What is there for me to feel, to learn, to hear, to know, that shall thrill me before it pass to others? What can I discover?—Nothing. Nothing whatsoever. One charm of travel dies here.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. The Innocents Abroad, ch. 26 (1869).)
  • 59.
    The whole object of travel is not to set foot on foreign land; it is at last to set foot on one's own country as a foreign land.
    (Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Tremendous Trifles, "The Riddle of the Ivy," (1909).)
    More quotations from: Gilbert Keith Chesterton, travel
  • 60.
    No doubt, to a man of sense, travel offers advantages. As many languages as he has, as many friends, as many arts and trades, so many times is he a man. A foreign country is a point of comparison, wherefrom to judge his own.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Culture," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, travel
[Hata Bildir]