Quotations About / On: TRAVEL

  • 51.
    Thus, far from the beaten highways and the dust and din of travel, we beheld the country privately, yet freely, and at our leisure.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 249, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, travel
  • 52.
    Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us, or we find it not.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Art," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 53.
    Traveling is a fool's paradise. Our first journeys discover to us the indifference of places.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Self-Reliance," Essays, First Series (1841).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • 54.
    The uses of travel are occasional, and short; but the best fruit it finds, when it finds it, is conversation; and this is a main function of life.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Considerations by the Way," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, travel, life
  • 55.
    I had rather have a fool to make me merry than experience to make me sad—and to travel for it too!
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 27-9. To Jaques, who has been defining his particular melancholy.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, travel, sad
  • 56.
    If it were not for the rivers (and he might go round their heads), a squirrel could here travel thus the whole breadth of the country.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Chesuncook" (1858) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 169, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, travel
  • 57.
    It is for want of self-culture that the superstition of Travelling, whose idols are Italy, England, Egypt, retains its fascination for all educated Americans.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Self-Reliance," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, italy, culture
  • 58.
    He may travel who can subsist on the wild fruits and game of the most cultivated country.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 324, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, travel
  • 59.
    Bachelors alone can travel freely, and without any twinges of their consciences touching desertion of the fire-side.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids" (1855), The Piazza Tales and Other Prose Pieces 1839-1860, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 9, eds. Harrison Hayford, Alma A. MacDougall, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1987).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, travel, fire, alone
  • 60.
    For the most part, only the light characters travel. Who are you that have no task to keep you at home?
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Culture," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
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