Quotations About / On: TRAVEL

  • 61.
    I should like to oblige you, but with people like us, we must be able to travel faster than our clients.
    (Stanley Kubrick (b. 1928), U.S. director, screenwriter. Captain Feeney (Arthur O'Sullivan), Barry Lyndon, after robbing Redmond Barry, who asked if he could at least keep his horse (1975).)
    More quotations from: Stanley Kubrick, travel, people
  • 62.
    I have found out that there ain't no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Tom Sawyer Abroad, ch. 11 (1894).)
  • 63.
    We can travel longer, night and day, without losing our spirits than almost any persons we ever met.
    (Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893), U.S. president. Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes: Nineteenth President of the United States, vol. III, p. 557, ed. Charles Richard Williams, The Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society, 5 vols. (1922-1926), Diary (June 6, 1879). Called "Rutherford the Rover," Hayes traveled more and publicized his pet policies by speaking to the people than did his predecessors.)
  • 64.
    Of all possible debauches, traveling is the greatest that I know; that's the one they invented when they got tired of all the others.
    (Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Letter, April 9, 1851, to Ernest Chevalier, trans. by William G. Allen. Correspondance, II, p. 309, Conard (1926-1933).)
    More quotations from: Gustave Flaubert
  • 65.
    Next to a shot of some good, habit-forming narcotic, there is nothing like travelling alone as a "builder-upper."
    (Robert Benchley (1889-1945), U.S. writer, humorist. Chips Off the Old Benchley, "He Travels Fastest—," Harper & Brothers (1949).)
    More quotations from: Robert Benchley, alone
  • 66.
    The whole object of travel is not to set foot on foreign land; it is at last to set foot on one's own country as a foreign land.
    (Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Tremendous Trifles, "The Riddle of the Ivy," (1909).)
    More quotations from: Gilbert Keith Chesterton, travel
  • 67.
    Traveling takes the ink out of one's pen as well as the cash out of one's purse.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. letter, Dec. 2, 1849, to Evert A. Duyckinck. Correspondence, vol. 14, The Writings of Herman Melville, ed. Lynn Horth (1993).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville
  • 68.
    It reminded me of Prometheus Bound. Here was traveling of the old heroic kind over the unaltered face of nature.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 260, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, nature
  • 69.
    Some people swallow the universe like a pill; they travel on through the world, like smiling images pushed from behind.
    (Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. "Crabbed Age and Youth," Virginibus Puerisque (1881).)
  • 70.
    The man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait till that other is ready, and it may be a long time before they get off.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 80, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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