Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: TRAVEL

  • 61.
    The intellect is vagabond, and our system of education fosters restlessness. Our minds travel when our bodies are forced to stay at home. We imitate; and what is imitation but the travelling of the mind?
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Self-Reliance," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 62.
    It reminded me of Prometheus Bound. Here was traveling of the old heroic kind over the unaltered face of nature.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 260, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, nature
  • 63.
    I am not much an advocate for traveling, and I observe that men run away to other countries, because they are not good in their own, and run back to their own, because they pass for nothing in the new places.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Culture," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • 64.
    Some people swallow the universe like a pill; they travel on through the world, like smiling images pushed from behind.
    (Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. "Crabbed Age and Youth," Virginibus Puerisque (1881).)
  • 65.
    One criticizes the English for carrying their teapots wherever they go, even lugging them up Mount Etna. But doesn't every nation have its teapot, in which, even when traveling, it brews the dried bundles of herbs brought from home?
    (Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749-1832), German poet, dramatist. Winckelmann, sect. "Strangers," (1805).)
    More quotations from: Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe, home
  • 66.
    The man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait till that other is ready, and it may be a long time before they get off.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 80, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 67.
    Man lording it over man, man kneeling to man, is a spectacle that Gabriel might well travel hitherward to behold; for never did he behold it in heaven.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 60, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, travel, heaven
  • 68.
    I never travel without my diary. One should always have something sensational to read in the train.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gwendolen, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 3.)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, travel
  • 69.
    The uses of travel are occasional, and short; but the best fruit it finds, when it finds it, is conversation; and this is a main function of life.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Considerations by the Way," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, travel, life
  • 70.
    The pleasure of leaving home, care-free, with no concern but to enjoy, has also as a pendant the pleasure of coming back to the old hearthstone, the home to which, however traveled, the heart still fondly turns, ignoring the burden of its anxieties and cares.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "Traveling" (1859-60), The Piazza Tales and Other Prose Pieces 1839-1860, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 9, eds. Harrison Hayford, Alma A. MacDougall, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1987). A lecture.)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, home, heart
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