Quotations About / On: TRUTH

  • 71.
    To say the truth, reason and love keep little company together nowadays.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bottom, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 3, sc. 1, l. 143-4. Amazed that Titania makes love to him.)
  • 72.
    ...I write to keep in contact with our ancestors and to spread truth to people.
    (Sonia Sanchez (b. 1934), African American author and political activist. As quoted in I Dream a World, by Brian Lanker (1989).)
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  • 73.
    The naked truth of it is, I have no shirt; I go woolward for penance.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Armado, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 5, sc. 2, l. 710. Concealing his poverty by claiming he is doing penance, and so wears no linen beneath his outer clothes.)
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  • 74.
    Convert life into truth.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Address, July 15, 1838, delivered before the senior class in Divinity College, Cambridge. "The Divinity School Address," The Portable Emerson, ed. Carl Bode (1946, repr. 1981). This is the epigram in the middle of a sentence that reads: "The capital secret of his profession, namely to convert life into truth, he had not learned." Here Emerson is criticizing an unnamed minister who Conrad Wright later convincingly argued to be Barzillai Frost, minister of the Concord Unitarian Church from 1837 to 1857. See Wright's The Liberal Christians (Unitarian Universalist Association, 1970, repr. 1980).)
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  • 75.
    Truth never turns to rebuke falsehood; her own straightforwardness is the severest correction.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 328, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 76.
    A truth ceases to be true when more than one person believes in it.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young," Chameleon (London, Dec. 1894). Shortly afterwards, under cross-examination by Edward Carson, Q.C., during Wilde's prosecution of the Marquess of Queensberry for criminal libel (Regina v. Queensberry, April 3, 1895), Wilde explained this aphorism: "That would be my metaphysical definition of truth; something so personal that the same truth could never be appreciated by two minds.")
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  • 77.
    There can be no literary equivalent to truth.
    (Laura Riding (1901-1991), U.S. poet. Extracts from Communications.)
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  • 78.
    Art, whose honesty must work through artifice, cannot avoid cheating truth.
    (Laura Riding (1901-1991), U.S. poet. Selected Poems: In Five Sets, preface (1975).)
    More quotations from: Laura Riding, honesty, truth, work
  • 79.
    The rarest quality in an epitaph is truth.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 178, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 80.
    Only lovers know the value and magnanimity of truth.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 284, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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