Quotations About / On: WAR

  • 11.
    Fiddle-dee-dee! War, war, war. This war talk's spoiling all the fun at every party this spring. I get so bored I could scream. Besides, there isn't going to be any war.
    (Sidney Howard (1891-1939), U.S. screenwriter. Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh), Gone With The Wind, to the Tarleton twins (Fred Crane, George Reeves) (1939).)
  • 12.
    A nice war is a war where everybody who is heroic is a hero, and everybody more or less is a hero in a nice war. Now this war is not at all a nice war.
    (Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author; relocated to France. Wars I Have Seen (1945). Written in 1943 about World War II, which was then in progress.)
    More quotations from: Gertrude Stein, war, hero
  • 13.
    If this phrase of the "balance of power" is to be always an argument for war, the pretext for war will never be wanting, and peace can never be secure.
    (John Bright (1811-1889), British radical politician. Speech, March 31, 1854, to House of Commons.)
    More quotations from: John Bright, war, peace, power
  • 14.
    War can only be abolished through war, and in order to get rid of the gun it is necessary to take up the gun.
    (Mao Zedong (1893-1976), Chinese founder of the People's Republic of China. "Problems of War and Strategy," vol. 2, November 6, 1938, Selected Works (1961).)
    More quotations from: Mao Zedong, war
  • 15.
    You say it is the good cause that hallows even war? I say unto you: it is the good war that hallows any cause.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 4, p. 59, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980); Thus Spoke Zarathustra, p. 47, trans. by Walter Kaufmann, New York, Penguin Books (1978). Zarathustra, in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, First Part, "On War and Warriors," (1883).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, war
  • 16.
    Strikes and boycotting are akin to war, and can be justified only on grounds analogous to those which justify war, viz., intolerable injustice and oppression.
    (Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893), U.S. president. Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes: Nineteenth President of the United States, vol. IV, p. 280, ed. Charles Richard Williams, The Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society, 5 vols. (1922-1926), Diary (April 6, 1886).)
    More quotations from: Rutherford Birchard Hayes, war
  • 17.
    The utter helplessness of a conquered people is perhaps the most tragic feature of a civil war or any other sort of war.
    (Rebecca Latimer Felton (1835-1930), U.S. author. Country Life in Georgia in the Days of My Youth, ch. 2 (1919). Remembering the aftermath of the Civil War. This remark comes from Felton's synopsis of an address she gave in 1900, in Augusta, Georgia, to the Daughters of the Confederacy.)
    More quotations from: Rebecca Latimer Felton, war, people
  • 18.
    [W]e must remember that so long as war exists on earth there will be some danger that even the Nation that most ardently desires peace may be drawn into war.
    (Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945), U.S. president. Ed. Samuel I. Rosenman, The Public Papers and Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Speech at Chautauqua, New York, August 14, 1936, vol. 5, p. 292, New York, Random House (1938-1950). Edward M. Bennett, Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Search for Security: American-Soviet Relations, 1933-1939, p. 79, Scholarly Resources, Inc. (1985). FDR wished to make Americans aware that no matter how much they wished to remain insulated from foreign entanglements and war that the decision might not be up to them.)
  • 19.
    A self-respecting nation is ready for anything, including war, except for a renunciation of its option to make war.
    (Simone Weil (1909-1943), French philosopher, mystic. repr. In Selected Essays, ed. Richard Rees (1962). "The Power of Words," Nouveaux Cahiers (April 1 and 15, 1937).)
    More quotations from: Simone Weil, war
  • 20.
    Civil strife is as much a greater evil than a concerted war effort as war itself is worse than peace.
    (Herodotus (c. 484-424 B.C.), Greek historian. The Histories, 8.3.)
    More quotations from: Herodotus, war, evil, peace
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