Quotations About / On: WEATHER

  • 11.
    States that rise quickly, just as all the other things of nature that are born and grow rapidly, cannot have roots and ramifications; the first bad weather kills them.
    (Niccolò Machiavelli (1469-1527), Italian political philosopher, statesman. The Prince, ch. 4 (1514).)
  • 12.
    Marriage brings one into fatal connection with custom and tradition, and traditions and customs are like the wind and weather, altogether incalculable.
    (Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Danish philosopher. "The Rotation Method," vol. 1, Either/Or (1843).)
  • 13.
    "Why don't you finally publish your works?" My friend, in bad weather one had better stay home.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Poems (1859).)
  • 14.
    Then climate is a great impediment to idle persons; we often resolve to give up the care of the weather, but still we regard the clouds and the rain.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Prudence," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, weather, rain
  • 15.
    He carries his English weather in his heart wherever he goes, and it becomes a cool spot in the desert, and a steady and sane oracle amongst all the delirium of mankind.
    (George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "The British Character," Soliloquies in England (1922).)
    More quotations from: George Santayana, weather, heart
  • 16.
    What dreadful hot weather we have! It keeps me in a continual state of inelegance.
    (Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. letter, Sept. 18, 1796.)
    More quotations from: Jane Austen, weather
  • 17.
    Pray don't talk to me about the weather, Mr. Worthing. Whenever people talk to me about the weather, I always feel quite certain that they mean something else.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gwendolen, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 1.)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, weather, people
  • 18.
    People may correctly remember the events of twenty years ago (a remarkable feat), but who remembers his fears, his disgusts, his tone of voice? It is like trying to bring back the weather of that time.
    (Martha Gellhorn (b. 1908), U.S. journalist, author. "The War in Finland," introduction, The Face of War (1959, rev. 1986).)
  • 19.
    All we need is a meteorologist who has once been soaked to the skin without ill effect. No one can write knowingly of the weather who walks bent over on wet days.
    (E.B. (Elwyn Brooks) White (1899-1985), U.S. author, editor. repr. in Writings from the New Yorker 1927-1976, ed. Rebecca M. Dale (1991). "Dismal?" New Yorker (Feb. 25, 1950).)
    More quotations from: E.B. (Elwyn Brooks) White, weather
  • 20.
    Family values are a little like family vacations—subject to changeable weather and remembered more fondly with the passage of time. Though it rained all week at the beach, it's often the momentary rainbows that we remember.
    (Leslie Dreyfous (20th century), U.S. author. AP story, The New York Times (October 25, 1992).)
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