Quotations About / On: WEATHER

  • 21.
    I couldn't find the spot where Frank had hidden the bag with the clothes. You can't imagine how cold I was until I found them. You know, I'm beginning to understand why ghosts moan so in this sort of weather.
    (Lester Cole (1904-1985), U.S. screenwriter, Kurt Siodmak (1902-1988), German, and Joe May (1880-1954). Geoffrey Radcliffe (Vincent Price), The Invisible Man Returns, explaining to Helen Manson why he was late meeting her (1940). Radcliffe had to be naked to make his invisible escape.)
    More quotations from: Lester Cole, weather, imagine, cold
  • 22.
    My religion is no garment to be put on and off with the weather. You had better know that, all of you. I shall worship as I please and hope for all men to worship as they please in Scotland.
    (Dudley Nichols (1895-1960), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Mary Stuart (Katharine Hepburn), Mary of Scotland, admonishing her court when they question her religious beliefs (1936). Based on the play by Maxwell Anderson.)
    More quotations from: Dudley Nichols, weather, hope
  • 23.
    Bobby read his future in women; his girls were omens, changes in the weather, and he'd sit all night in the Gentleman Loser waiting for the season to lay a new face down in front of him like a card.
    (William Gibson (b. 1948), U.S. science fiction (cyberpunk) writer. repr. Burning Chrome, Ace Books (1987). "Burning Chrome," Omni (July, 1982).)
  • 24.
    The weather and my mood have little connection. I have my foggy and my fine days within me; my prosperity or misfortune has little to do with the matter.
    (Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 107 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).)
    More quotations from: Blaise Pascal, weather
  • 25.
    If it is true that rock stars weather into institutions, then Dylan has started now to resemble the Church of England: the dwindling popularity of his product cannot diminish the intensity of the arguments among his congregation.
    (Robert Sandall, British journalist. Sunday Times (London, May 19, 1991).)
    More quotations from: Robert Sandall, weather
  • 26.
    Surely the fates are forever kind, though Nature's laws are more immutable than any despot's, yet to man's daily life they rarely seem rigid, but permit him to relax with license in summer weather. He is not harshly reminded of the things he may not do.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 34, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 27.
    You say there is no religion now. 'Tis like saying in rainy weather, there is no sun, when at that moment we are witnessing one of his superlative effects.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Worship," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, weather, sun
  • 28.
    The change from storm and winter to serene and mild weather, from dark and sluggish hours to bright and elastic ones, is a memorable crisis which all things proclaim. It is seemingly instantaneous at last.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 344, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 29.
    The opening of large tracts by the ice-cutters commonly causes a pond to break up earlier; for the water, agitated by the wind, even in cold weather, wears away the surrounding ice.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 330, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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