Quotations About / On: WIND

  • 61.
    To avoid tripping on the chain of the past, you have to pick it up and wind it about you.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Fourteenth Selection, New York (1994).)
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  • 62.
    ...expatriated Americans, even Henry James himself, have always seemed to me somewhat anchorless, rudderless, drifting before the wind.
    (Virginia Crocheron Gildersleeve (1877-1965), U.S. educator. Many a Good Crusade, part 3 (1954). Gildersleeve, Dean of Barnard College, was active for decades in international political work and lived in England much of the time with her "intimate friend," the Englishwoman Caroline Spurgeon. Henry James (1843-1916), an important American novelist, left the United States to settle first in Paris and then, in 1876, in England, where he remained for the rest of his life.)
  • 63.
    As liberty and intelligence have increased the people have more and more revolted against the theological dogmas that contradict common sense and wound the tenderest sensibilities of the soul.
    (Catherine E. Beecher (1800-1878), U.S. educator and author. As quoted in Catherine Beecher, ch. 18, by Kathryn Kish Sklar (1973). Written in 1864.)
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  • 64.
    The wind of change is blowing through the continent. Whether we like it or not, this growth of national consciousness is a political fact.
    (Harold MacMillan (1894-1986), British Conservative politician, prime minister. speech, Feb. 3, 1960, to both houses of the South African Parliament, Cape Town. Pointing the Way (1972).)
    More quotations from: Harold MacMillan, wind, change
  • 65.
    The wind of change is blowing through the continent. Whether we like it or not, this growth of national consciousness is a political fact.
    (Harold MacMillan (1894-1986), British Conservative politician, prime minister. speech, Feb. 3, 1960, to both houses of the South African Parliament, Cape Town. Pointing the Way (1972).)
    More quotations from: Harold MacMillan, wind, change
  • 66.
    I would rather not see such winds subside, which carry your slow ship away, although they leave me, cast down, on an empty shore, often, with clenched hand, calling you cruel.
    (Propertius Sextus (c. 50-16 B.C.), Roman elegist. Oxford Classical Text, I.8A. 13-16.)
    More quotations from: Propertius Sextus, empty, leave
  • 67.
    The populace is like the sea, motionless in itself, but stirred by every wind, even the lightest breeze.
    (Titus Livius (Livy) (59 B.C.-A.D. 17), Roman historian. Histories, XXVIII, 27.)
    More quotations from: Titus Livius (Livy), wind, sea
  • 68.
    Being a Jew is like walking in the wind or swimming: you are touched at all points and conscious everywhere.
    (Lionel Trilling (1905-1975), U.S. critic. Notebook entry, 1928. Partisan Review 50th Anniversary Edition, ed. William Philips (1985).)
    More quotations from: Lionel Trilling, swimming, wind
  • 69.
    Not only does the wind of accidents stir me according to its blowing, but I am also stirred and troubled by the instability of my attitude.
    (Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of The Inconsistency Of Our Actions," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. II, ch. 1, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).)
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  • 70.
    One cannot serve this Eros without becoming a stranger in society as it is today; one cannot commit oneself to this form of love without incurring a mortal wound.
    (Klaus Mann (1906-1949), German author, son of Thomas Mann. Mann was speaking of his homosexuality. Quoted in Marcel Reich-Ranicki, "Klaus Mann," Thomas Mann and His Family (1987, trans. 1989).)
    More quotations from: Klaus Mann, commit, today, love
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