Quotations About / On: WORK

  • 71.
    Men were not intended to work with the accuracy of tools, to be precise and perfect in all their actions.
    (John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. II, ch. 6 (1853).)
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  • 72.
    It is the art of mankind to polish the world, and every one who works is scrubbing in some part.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, December 19, 1853, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 223, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 73.
    Slang is a language that rolls up its sleeves, spits on its hands and goes to work.
    (Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), U.S. poet. New York Times (Feb. 13, 1959).)
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  • 74.
    Art, whose honesty must work through artifice, cannot avoid cheating truth.
    (Laura Riding (1901-1991), U.S. poet. Selected Poems: In Five Sets, preface (1975).)
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  • 75.
    A man thinking or working is always alone, let him be where he will.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 150, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 76.
    The work of vegetation begins first in the irritability of the bark and leaf-buds.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Love," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847). This is reminiscent of the definition of life as the ability to be irritated.)
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  • 77.
    A man is fed, not that he may be fed, but that he may work.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 2 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).)
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  • 78.
    This were to be truly immortal;Mto be perpetuated in our works, and not in our names.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 142, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Spoken by Babbalanja, the philosopher.)
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  • 79.
    The Indian said a particularly long prayer this Sunday evening, as if to atone for working in the morning.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 229, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 80.
    No work of art ever puts forward views. Views belong to people who are not artists.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Quoted during Regina (Wilde) v. Queensberry (April 3, 1895). In answer to Edward Carson, Q.C., during Wilde's prosecution of the Marquess of Queensberry for criminal libel.)
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