Quotations About / On: YESTERDAY

  • 11.
    For us, the best time is always yesterday.
    (Tatyana Tolstaya (b. 1951), Russian author. Independent (London, May 31, 1990). Said of the Russians.)
    More quotations from: Tatyana Tolstaya, yesterday, time
  • 12.
    In politics, yesterday's lie is attacked only to flatter today's.
    (Jean Rostand (1894-1977), French biologist, writer. repr. In The Substance of Man, "A Biologist's Thoughts," ch. 10 (1962). Pensées d'un Biologiste (1939).)
    More quotations from: Jean Rostand, yesterday, today
  • 13.
    The rule is, jam tomorrow and jam yesterday—but never jam today.
    (Lewis Carroll [Charles Lutwidge Dodgson] (1832-1898), British author, mathematician. The White Queen, in Through the Looking-Glass, "Wool and Water," (1872).)
  • 14.
    Today is, after all, today, but yesterday is of the same substance as tomorrow.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Primislaus, in Libussa, act 3 (1872).)
  • 15.
    You made a mistake yesterday! But, learn something today and, be straight with your life.
    (Correction)
    More quotations from: Edward Kofi Louis
  • 16.
    Yesterday is gone! But, today starts the best day.
    (Nature.)
    More quotations from: Edward Kofi Louis
  • 17.
    I never felt so fervently thankful, so soothed, so tranquil, so filled with the blessed peace, as I did yesterday when I learned that Michael Angelo was dead.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. The Innocents Abroad, ch. 27 (1896). "I used to worship the mighty genius of Michael Angelo," Twain wrote of his visit to Rome, "but I do not want Michael Angelo for breakfast—for luncheon—for dinner—for tea—for supper—for between meals.... Here—here it is frightful. He designed St. Peter's; he designed the Pope ... the eternal bore designed the Eternal City, and unless all men and books do lie, he painted everything in it!")
  • 18.
    Whatever is a reality today, whatever you touch and believe in and that seems real for you today, is going to be—like the reality of yesterday—an illusion tomorrow.
    (Luigi Pirandello (1867-1936), Italian author, playwright. The father, in Six Characters in Search of an Author, act 3 (1921).)
  • 19.
    Yesterday, December 7, 1941Ma date that will live in infamy—the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.
    (Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945), U.S. president. ed. Samuel I. Rosenman, The Public Papers and Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt, 13 vols., New York (1938-1950). FDR Speaks authorized edition of speeches, 1933-1945 (recordings of Franklin Roosevelt's public addresses), side 9, declaration of war—"Day of Infamy" (Dec. 8, 1941), ed. Henry Steele Commager, Introduction by Eleanor Roosevelt, Washington Records, Inc. (1960).)
  • 20.
    Which is better: to have Fun with Fungi or to have Idiocy with Ideology, to have Wars because of Words, to have Tomorrow's Misdeeds out of Yesterday's Miscreeds?
    (Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Culture and the Individual," Moksha: Writings on Psychedelics and the Visionary Experience (1931-1963), eds. Horowitz and Palmer (1977).)
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