Richard Crashaw

(1612 - 1649 / England)

Quotations

  • ''To these, whom Death again did wed,
    This grave's the second Marriage-bed.''
    Richard Crashaw (1613?-1649), British poet. An Epitaph upon Husband and Wife Who Died and Were Buried Together (l. 1-2). . . Seven Centuries of Poetry; Chaucer to Dylan Thomas. A. N. Jeffares, ed. (1955) Longmans, Green & Company.
    6 person liked.
    2 person did not like.
  • ''(Pillow hard, and sheets not warm)
    Love made the bed; they'll take no harm.''
    Richard Crashaw (1613?-1649), British poet. An Epitaph upon Husband and Wife Who Died and Were Buried Together (l. 13-14). . . Seven Centuries of Poetry; Chaucer to Dylan Thomas. A. N. Jeffares, ed. (1955) Longmans, Green & Company.
  • ''We saw Thee in Thy balmy nest,
    Young Dawn of our Eternal Day!
    We saw Thine eyes break from the East
    And chase the trembling shades away.
    We saw Thee and we blest the sight,
    We saw Thee by Thine own sweet light.''
    Richard Crashaw (1613?-1649), British poet. In the Holy Nativity of Our Lord God (l. 31-36). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''Welcome, all wonders in one night!
    Eternity shut in a span,
    Summer in winter, day in night,
    Heaven in earth, and God in man.
    Great Little One! Whose all-embracing birth
    Lifts earth to heaven, stoops heaven to earth.''
    Richard Crashaw (1613?-1649), British poet. In the Holy Nativity of Our Lord God (l. 79-84). . . Seventeenth-Century Verse and Prose, Vols. I-II. Vol. I: 1600-1660; Vol. II: 1660-1700. Helen C. White, Ruth C. Wallerstein, and Ricardo Quintana, eds. (1951, 1952) The Macmillan Company.
  • ''Runs to and fro, complaining his sweet cares
    Because those pretious mysteries that dwell
    In musick's ravish't soule hee dare not tell,
    But whisper to the world: thus doe they vary
    Each string his Note, as if they meant to carry
    Their Masters blest soule (snatcht out at his Eares
    By a strong Extasy) through all the sphaeres
    Of Musicks heaven; and seat it there on high
    In th' Empyrum of pure Harmony.''
    Richard Crashaw (1613?-1649), British poet. Music's Duel (l. 142-150). . . Seventeenth-Century Verse and Prose, Vols. I-II. Vol. I: 1600-1660; Vol. II: 1660-1700. Helen C. White, Ruth C. Wallerstein, and Ricardo Quintana, eds. (1951, 1952) The Macmillan Company.
  • ''And now where e're he strayes
    Among the Galilaean mountains,
    Or more unwelcome wayes,
    Hee's follow'd by two faithfull fountaines,
    Two walking Baths, two weeping motions;
    Portable and compendious Oceans.''
    Richard Crashaw (1613?-1649), British poet. Saint Mary Magdalene (l. 109-114). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Every Morne from hence,
    A brisk Cherub something sips,
    Whose sacred influence
    Adds sweetnes to his sweetest lips,
    Then to his Musick, and his song
    Tastes of his breakefast all day long.''
    Richard Crashaw (1613?-1649), British poet. Saint Mary Magdalene (l. 25-30). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
  • ''O thou undaunted daughter of desires!
    By all thy dower of lights and fires;
    By all the eagle in thee, all the dove;
    By all thy lives and deaths of love;
    By thy large draughts of intellectual day,
    And by thy thirsts of love more large then they;
    By all thy brim-fill'd Bowls of fierce desire,
    By thy last Morning's draught of liquid fire;
    By the full kingdom of that final kiss
    That seiz'd thy parting Soul, and seal'd thee his;''
    Richard Crashaw (1613?-1649), British poet. The Flaming Heart (l. 93-102). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''Go, smiling souls, your new-built cages break,
    In heaven you'll learn to sing, ere here to speak,
    Nor let the milky fonts that bathe your thirst
    Be your delay;
    The place that calls you hence is, at the worst,
    Milk all the way.''
    Richard Crashaw (1613?-1649), British poet. To the Infant Martyrs (l. 1-6). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''What heaven-entreated heart is this
    Stands trembling at the gate of bliss;
    Holds fast the door, yet dares not venture
    Fairly to open it and enter?
    Whose definition is a doubt
    'Twixt life and death, 'twixt in and out?''
    Richard Crashaw (1613?-1649), British poet. To the Noblest and Best of Ladies, the Countess of Denbigh (l. 1-6). . . Seventeenth Century Poetry; the Schools of Donne and Jonson. Hugh Kenner, ed. (1964) Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

Read more quotations »

The Recommendation

These houres, and that which hovers o’re my End,
Into thy hands, and hart, lord, I commend.

Take Both to Thine Account, that I and mine
In that Hour, and in these, may be all thine.

That as I dedicate my devoutest Breath
To make a kind of Life for my lord’s Death,

[Hata Bildir]