Rudyard Kipling

(30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936 / Bombay)

Rudyard Kipling Quotes

  • ''What is a woman that you forsake her,
    And the hearth-fire and the home-acre,
    To go with the old grey Widow-maker?''
    Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), British poet. Puck of Pook's Hill (l. 1-3). . . Rudyard Kipling; Complete Verse; Definitive Edition. (1989) Doubleday.
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  • ''Cities and Thrones and Powers
    Stand in Time's eye,
    Almost as long as flowers,
    Which daily die:''
    Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), British poet. Puck of Pook's Hill (l. 1-4). . . Rudyard Kipling; Complete Verse; Definitive Edition. (1989) Doubleday.
  • ''She has no strong white arms to fold you,
    But the ten-times-fingering weed to hold you—
    Out on the rocks where the tide has rolled you.''
    Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), British poet. Puck of Pook's Hill (l. 7-9). . . Rudyard Kipling; Complete Verse; Definitive Edition. (1989) Doubleday.
  • '''Tisn't beauty, so to speak, nor good talk necessarily. It's just IT. Some women'll stay in a man's memory if they once walked down a street.''
    Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), British author, poet. Pyecroft, in "Mrs. Bathurst," Traffics and Discoveries (1904). Referring to Mrs. Bathurst.
  • ''A people always ends by resembling its shadow.''
    Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), British author, poet. quoted in Maurois, The Art of Writing, "The Writer's Craft," sct. 2 (1960). Said to author and critic André Maurois c. 1930, on the subject of the transformation of Germany.
  • ''Power without responsibility—the prerogative of the harlot throughout the ages.''
    Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), British author, poet. quoted in The Kipling Journal (Dec. 1971). The quotation is often ascribed to British prime minister Stanley Baldwin, Kipling's cousin. Baldwin used the words in a speech, Mar. 17, 1931, attacking press barons Lord Beaverbrook and Lord Rothermere, whose newspapers he called "engines of propaganda."
  • ''Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind.''
    Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), British author, poet. quoted in Times (London, Feb. 15, 1923), speech, Feb. 14, 1923.
  • ''The tumult and the shouting dies;
    The Captains and the Kings depart:
    Still stands Thine ancient sacrifice,
    An humble and a contrite heart.''
    Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), British poet. Recessional (l. 7-10). . . Rudyard Kipling; Complete Verse; Definitive Edition. (1989) Doubleday.
  • ''The tumult and the shouting dies;
    The Captains and the Kings depart:
    Still stands Thine ancient sacrifice,
    An humble and a contrite heart.
    Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
    Lest we forget—lest we forget!''
    Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), British writer, poet. repr. In The Definitive Edition of Rudyard Kipling's Verse (1940). "Recessional," st. 2 (1897). "Lest we forget" was adopted as an epitaph by the War Graves Commission—for which Kipling worked—after World War I....
  • ''Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
    Lest we forget—lest we forget!''
    Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), British poet. Recessional (l. 5-6). . . Rudyard Kipling; Complete Verse; Definitive Edition. (1989) Doubleday.

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Best Poem of Rudyard Kipling

If

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too:
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or, being lied about, don't deal in lies,
Or being hated don't give way to hating,
And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise;

If you can dream---and not make dreams your master;
If you can think---and not make thoughts your aim,
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the ...

Read the full of If

Quiquern

The People of the Eastern Ice, they are melting like the snow--
They beg for coffee and sugar; they go where the white men go.
The People of the Western Ice, they learn to steal and fight;
They sell their furs to the trading-post; they sell their souls to
the white.
The People of the Southern Ice, they trade with the whaler's
crew;
Their women have many ribbons, but their tents are torn and few.
But the People of the Elder Ice, beyond the white man's ken--

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