Rupert Brooke

(1887-1915 / Warwickshire / England)

Comments about Rupert Brooke

  • Rookie Sarah Grace Pierce (7/26/2012 7:25:00 AM)

    Read Ante Aram, it is so beautiful, a blood tired soldier, unclean, read just the last 5 lines...I have remembered them for 40 years or so, in a Holy Space...

    57 person liked.
    76 person did not like.
  • Rookie Lorenzo Rodriguez (4/23/2012 9:46:00 AM)

    Like all poets, this guy is no exception, he writes to deep. People, especially Americans, will not understand what these deep poets write, they must be more shallow in order to convey to people today.;

  • Rookie - 108 Points Koena Mokoena (10/21/2011 9:52:00 AM)

    Hey yo!
    i would like to say i was impressed by your poem ' Safety' especially these words;
    War knows no power. Safe shall be my going,
    Secretly armed against all death's endeavour;
    But i understand the following lines.
    Safe though all safety's lost; safe where men fall;
    And if these poor limbs die, safest of all.

    According to my own point of view, i came to planet earth with an aim, objective & vision. Hence, i won't give up until i turn my dream into reality.

    Have a nice day!

    Mr. Koena France Mokoena
    South Africa,
    www.poemhunter.com/kfmproductions

  • Rookie Harvey Wachtel (10/19/2011 9:12:00 AM)

    I think it's obvious that Richard Scotte misread Ian Fraser's post, and that he actually agrees with him. He must have taken 'Rupert Brooke's poetry gained an undeserved reputation' out of context. Mr. Fraser didn't assert that Rupert Brooke's reputation for *poetry* is undeserved; he said that his reputation for 'jingoism and a simplistic view of war' was undeserved.

    After reading what's posted of '1914', I agree wholeheartedly. Brooke strikes me as a minor-league Wilfred Owen. If you want jingoism, try John McCrae's well-known 'In Flanders Fields', a poem that has made me want to barf since they force-fed it to me in elementary school. I don't understand how anyone can be 'patriotic' about such a stupid war as WWI.

  • Rookie Richard Scotte (10/6/2011 5:34:00 AM)

    I think 'undeserved ' is a slur - Rupert Brooke has his followers just as Shakepeare does and (dare `i say it) Bacon! - people, especially artists who reach a certain level of popularity through their own talent, wit and personality. They will always win public acclaim from somewhere.
    From what I've read he was only into war of necessity because it intruded into his life. Even if peer pressure led him to volunteer - or was it purely the youthful patriotism that assails our youth whenrever there is War in the air
    No, Brooke was mostly about Love - winning, loosing, enjoying and despairing. His poignancy comes to the fore 'I have peace to know your worth - now all is over.'.........and........'Who defiles the Love defiles the Lover - but what man lauds the thing he's thrown away.'
    He was able to express in words the thoughts of thousands of people who could not voice those thoughts for lack of words, even though they had experienced similar emotions themselves = his words assuaged them in their own lament!
    For many he epitomises the spiritual aspects of his poetry - See ' lines written in the belief.'........' and many others in which visions of the spirit world are dangled before our eyes in so tantalising manner......I could go on but you get my drift - just read him and enjoy.

  • Rookie - 18 Points Ian Fraser (10/19/2009 2:47:00 PM)

    Rupert Brooke's poetry gained an undeserved reputation after WWI for jingoism and a simplistic view of war. However, reading this and other poems it is clear that Brooke never glorified war as Tennyson had for, example, in the celebrated Charge of the Light Brigade, merely the heroism of those who fought in it. This poem is a simple elegy of loss and, notwithstanding the more famous, The Soldier, perhaps the best he wrote.

  • Rookie - 68 Points Paul Henry Dallaire (10/19/2009 9:24:00 AM)

    1914 the dead
    A great poem & an astounding memorian for the dead soldiers.

Best Poem of Rupert Brooke

1914 V: The Soldier

If I should die, think only this of me:
That there's some corner of a foreign field
That is for ever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,
A body of England's, breathing English air,
Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of home.

And think, this heart, all evil shed away,
A pulse in the eternal mind, no less
Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;
Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
And laughter, learnt of ...

Read the full of 1914 V: The Soldier

The Treasure

When colour goes home into the eyes,
And lights that shine are shut again
With dancing girls and sweet birds’ cries
Behind the gateways of the brain;
And that no-place which gave them birth, shall close
The rainbow and the rose:—

Still may Time hold some golden space
Where I’ll unpack that scented store

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