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Quotations

  • ''A widow's refusal of a lover is seldom so explicit as to exclude hope.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 4, p. 170, AMS Press (1990).
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  • ''To be a clergyman, and all that is compassionate and virtuous, ought to be the same thing.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 3, p. 190.
  • ''Who ever was in fault, Self being judge?''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 1, p. 70, AMS Press (1990).
  • ''Oh! what a poor thing is human life in its best enjoyments!—subjected to imaginary evils when it has no real ones to disturb it! and that can be made as effectually unhappy by its apprehensions of remote contingencies as if it was struggling with the pains of a present distress!''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1740). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 2, penultimate journal entry, Riverside (1971).
  • ''Whenever we approve, we can find a hundred good reasons to justify our approbation. Whenever we dislike, we can find a thousand to justify our dislike.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 8, p. 181, AMS Press (1990).
  • ''Humility is a grace that shines in a high condition but cannot, equally, in a low one because a person in the latter is already, perhaps, too much humbled.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4, p. 303.
  • ''All that hoops are good for is to clean dirty shoes and keep fellows at a distance.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 2, p. 168, AMS Press (1990).
  • ''Shame is a fitter and generally a more effectual punishment for a child than beating.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4, p. 371.
  • ''A brother may not be a friend, but a friend will always be a brother.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 2, p. 15, AMS Press (1990).
  • ''As a child is indulged or checked in its early follies, a ground is generally laid for the happiness or misery of the future man.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4, p. 370.

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