Samuel Richardson


Quotations

  • ''A widow's refusal of a lover is seldom so explicit as to exclude hope.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 4, p. 170, AMS Press (1990).
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  • ''To be a clergyman, and all that is compassionate and virtuous, ought to be the same thing.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 3, p. 190.
  • ''Who ever was in fault, Self being judge?''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 1, p. 70, AMS Press (1990).
  • ''Whenever we approve, we can find a hundred good reasons to justify our approbation. Whenever we dislike, we can find a thousand to justify our dislike.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 8, p. 181, AMS Press (1990).
  • ''Humility is a grace that shines in a high condition but cannot, equally, in a low one because a person in the latter is already, perhaps, too much humbled.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4, p. 303.
  • ''All that hoops are good for is to clean dirty shoes and keep fellows at a distance.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 2, p. 168, AMS Press (1990).
  • ''Shame is a fitter and generally a more effectual punishment for a child than beating.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4, p. 371.
  • ''A brother may not be a friend, but a friend will always be a brother.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 2, p. 15, AMS Press (1990).
  • ''As a child is indulged or checked in its early follies, a ground is generally laid for the happiness or misery of the future man.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1742). Pamela, in Pamela, vol. 4, p. 370.
  • ''Handsome husbands often make a wife's heart ache.''
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Anna Howe, in Clarissa, vol. 3, p. 172, AMS Press (1990).

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