200 match(es) found in quotations


Quotations
Robert Burns :
Lay the proud usurpers low! Tyrants fall in every foe! Liberty's in every blow! Let us do, or die!
[Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet. Scots Wha Hae (l. 21-24). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).]
Henry David Thoreau :
It is not every man who can be a Christian, even in a very moderate sense, whatever education you give him. It is a matter of constitution and temperament, after all. He may have to be born again many times. I have known many a man who pretended to be a Christian, in whom it was ridiculous, for he had no genius for it. It is not every man who can be a free man, even.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Last Days of John Brown" (1860), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 445, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
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Ralph Waldo Emerson :
As every pool reflects the image of the sun, so every thought and thing restores us an image and creature of the supreme Good. The universe is perforated by a million channels for his activity. All things mount and mount.
[Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Plato; or, the Philosopher," Representative Men (1850).]
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Woodrow Wilson :
There has been something crude and heartless and unfeeling in our haste to succeed and be great. Our thought has been "Let every man look out for himself, let every generation look out for itself," while we reared giant machinery which made it impossible that any but those who stood at the levers of control should have any chance to look out for themselves.
[Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. Democratic politician, president. First inaugural address, March 4, 1913.]
Herman Melville :
It is a thing which every sensible American should learn from every sensible Englishman, that glare and glitter, gimcracks and gewgaws, are not indispensable to domestic solacement.
[Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids" (1855), The Piazza Tales and Other Prose Pieces 1839-1860, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 9, eds. Harrison Hayford, Alma A. MacDougall, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1987).]
Ralph Waldo Emerson :
Write it on your heart that every day is the best day in the year. No man has learned anything rightly until he knows that every day is Doomsday.
[Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Works and Days," Society and Solitude (1870).]
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Gertrude Stein :
... the French know that you must not succeed you must rise from the ashes and how could you rise from the ashes if there were no ashes, but the Germans never think of ashes and so when there are ashes there is no rising, not at all and every day and in every way this is clearer and clearer.
[Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author; relocated to France. Wars I Have Seen (1945). Written in 1943.]
Thomas Babington Macaulay :
A few more days, and this essay will follow the Defensio Populi to the dust and silence of the upper shelf.... For a month or two it will occupy a few minutes of chat in every drawing-room, and a few columns in every magazine; and it will then ... be withdrawn, to make room for the forthcoming novelties.
[Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859), British historian, Whig politician. Edinburgh Review (Aug. 1825). Milton, Critical and Historical Essays (1843). Referring to Milton's long lost Treatise on the Doctrines of Christianity.]
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Ralph Waldo Emerson :
I may as well say, what all men feel, that whilst our every amiable and very innocent representatives and senators at Washington are accomplished lawyers and merchants, and every eloquent at dinners and at caucuses, there is a disastrous want of men in New England.
[Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Address Delivered in Concord on the Anniversary of the Emancipation of the Negroes in the British West Indies, August 1, 1884," Miscellanies (1883, repr. 1903).]
Ralph Waldo Emerson :
Every day brings a ship, Every ship brings a word; Well for those who have no fear, Looking seaward well assured That the word the vessel brings Is the word they wish to hear.
[Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Letters," May-Day and Other Pieces (1867).]
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