26 match(es) found in quotations


Quotations
William Shakespeare :
I am thy father's spirit, Doomed for a certain term to walk the night, And for the day confined to fast in fires, Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature Are burnt and purged away. But that I am forbid To tell the secrets of my prison house, I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes like stars start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part, And each particular hair to stand on end Like quills upon the fretful porpentine. But this eternal blazon must not be To ears of flesh and blood.
[William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Hamlet (I, v). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.]
Read more quotations about / on: hair, father, house, night, nature
Isaac Watts :
The busy tribes of flesh and blood, With all their lives and cares, Are carried downwards by thy flood, And lost in following years. Time, like an ever-rolling stream, Bears all its sons away; They fly forgotten, as a dream Dies at the opening day.
[Isaac Watts (1674-1748), British hymn writer. Our God, Our Help in Ages Past (l. 21-28). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.]
Read more quotations about / on: fly, dream, lost, time
William Shakespeare :
I prithee, daughter, do not make me mad. I will not trouble thee, my child; farewell: We'll no more meet, no more see one another. But yet thou art my flesh, my blood, my daughter— Or rather a disease that's in my flesh, Which I must needs call mine.
[William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 4, l. 218-23.]
Read more quotations about / on: daughter, farewell, child
William Shakespeare :
So in the world: 'tis furnished well with men, And men are flesh and blood, and apprehensive; Yet in the number I do know but one That unassailable holds on his rank, Unshaked of motion; and that I am he.
[William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caesar, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 1, l. 66-70. Boasting of his steadiness in holding his position unshaken by movement around him, or by "motions" means petitions; "apprehensive" means capable of perception.]
Read more quotations about / on: world
Walt Whitman :
Is this then a touch? quivering me to a new identity, Flames and ether making a rush for my veins, Treacherous tip of me reaching and crowding to help them, My flesh and blood playing out lightning to strike what is hardly different from myself, On all sides prurient provokers stiffening my limbs,
[Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Song of Myself (Fr. XXVIII, l. 619-623). . . The Complete Poems [Walt Whitman]. Francis Murphy, ed. (1975; repr. 1986) Penguin Books.]
Read more quotations about / on: identity
2d Earl Of Rochester, John Wilmot :
A Spirit free, to choose for my own share, What sort of Flesh and Blood I pleas'd to wear, I'd be a Dog, a Monkey or a Bear, Or any thing, but that vain Animal, Who is so proud of being rational.
[John Wilmot, 2d Earl Of Rochester (1647-1680), British poet. A Satire against Mankind (l. 3-7). . . Oxford Book of Satirical Verse, The. Geoffrey Grigson, comp. (1980) Oxford University Press.]
Read more quotations about / on: animal, dog
T.S. (Thomas Stearns) Eliot :
The dripping blood our only drink, The bloody flesh our only food: In spite of which we like to think That we are sound, substantial flesh and blood— Again, in spite of that, we call this Friday good.
[T.S. (Thomas Stearns) Eliot (1888-1965), Anglo-American poet, critic. East Coker, pt. 4, Four Quartets.]
Read more quotations about / on: food
T.S. (Thomas Stearns) Eliot :
The dripping blood our only drink, The bloody flesh our only food: In spite of which we like to think That we are sound, substantial flesh and blood— Again, in spite of that, we call this Friday good.
[T.S. (Thomas Stearns) Eliot (1888-1965), Anglo-American poet, critic. Four Quartets (1942). "East Coker," pt. 4 (1940).]
Read more quotations about / on: food
George Gordon Noel Byron :
I wonder if his appetite was good? Or, if it were, if also his digestion? Methinks at meals some odd thoughts might intrude, And conscience ask a curious sort of question, About the right divine how far we should Sell flesh and blood.
[George Gordon Noel Byron (1788-1824), British poet. Don Juan. OAEL-2. The Poems of Byron. Paul E. More, ed. (1933) Houghton Mifflin.]
William Butler Yeats :
I can exchange opinion with any neighbouring mind, I have as healthy flesh and blood as any rhymer's had, But O! my Heart could bear no more when the upland caught the wind; I ran, I ran, from my love's side because my Heart went mad.
[William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "Owen Aherne and His Dancers."]
Read more quotations about / on: heart, wind, love
[Hata Bildir]