200 match(es) found in quotations


Quotations
A.C. (Algernon Charles) Swinburne :
And the best and the worst of this is That neither is most to blame, If you have forgotten my kisses And I have forgotten your name.
[A.C. (Algernon Charles) Swinburne (1837-1909), British poet, critic. An Interlude, st. 14 (1866).]
Henry David Thoreau :
When at the pond, I wished sometimes to add fish to my fare for variety. I have actually fished from the same kind of necessity that the first fishers did. Whatever humanity I might conjure up against it was all factitious, and concerned my philosophy more than my feelings. I speak of fishing only now, for I had long felt differently about fowling, and sold my gun before I went to the woods. Not that I am less humane than others, but I did not perceive that my feelings were much affected. I did not pity the fishes nor the worms. This was habit.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 234, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
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Abraham Lincoln :
And then, the negro being doomed, and damned, and forgotten, to everlasting bondage, is the white man quite certain that the tyrant demon will not turn upon him too?
[Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. fragment, notes for speeches, c. Aug. 21, 1858. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 553, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).]
Thomas Hardy :
It is difficult for a woman to define her feelings in language which is chiefly made by men to express theirs.
[Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Bathsheba, in Far from the Madding Crowd, ch. 51 (1874).]
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Henry David Thoreau :
We never exchange more than three words with a Friend in our lives on that level to which our thoughts and feelings almost habitually rise.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 281, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
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Charles Baudelaire :
As a small child, I felt in my heart two contradictory feelings, the horror of life and the ecstasy of life.
[Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. My Heart Laid Bare, LV (1887).]
Read more quotations about / on: child, heart, life
Edgar Allan Poe :
How much more intense is the excitement wrought in the feelings of a crowd by the contemplation of human agony, than that brought about by the most appalling spectacles of inanimate matter.
[Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The narrator, in "Metzengerstein," Saturday Courier (1832). The aesthetic of terror.]
Margaret Atwood :
I've never understood why people consider youth a time of freedom and joy. It's probably because they have forgotten their own.
[Margaret Atwood (b. 1939), Canadian novelist, poet, critic. repr. In Dancing Girls (1977). The narrator, in "Hair Jewelry," Ms. (New York, 1976).]
Read more quotations about / on: joy, freedom, time, people
Jean Cocteau :
All good music resembles something. Good music stirs by its mysterious resemblance to the objects and feelings which motivated it.
[Jean Cocteau (1889-1963), French author, filmmaker. repr. In Collected Works, vol. 9 (1950). "Le Coq et l'Arlequin," Le Rappel à L'Ordre (1926).]
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Abraham Lincoln :
If the good people in their wisdom shall see fit to keep me in the background, I have been too familiar with disappointments to be very much chagrined.
[Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. communication to the people of Sangamo County, Mar. 9, 1832. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 8, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).]
Read more quotations about / on: people
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