200 match(es) found in quotations


Quotations
Charles Baudelaire :
The man who, from the beginning of his life, has been bathed at length in the soft atmosphere of a woman, in the smell of her hands, of her bosom, of her knees, of her hair, of her supple and floating clothes, ... has contracted from this contact a tender skin and a distinct accent, a kind of androgyny without which the harshest and most masculine genius remains, as far as perfection in art is concerned, an incomplete being.
[Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Artificial Paradise, An Opium-eater, VII. Childhood Sorrows (1860). On men who have been raised by women.]
Read more quotations about / on: hair, woman, life
Abraham Lincoln :
The case of Andrews is really a very bad one, as appears by the record already before me. Yet before receiving this I had ordered his punishment commuted to imprisonment ... and had so telegraphed. I did this, not on any merit in the case, but because I am trying to evade the butchering business lately.
[Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. endorsement concerning Henry Andrews, Jan. 7, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7, p. 111, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).]
Ralph Waldo Emerson :
We write from aspiration and antagonism, as well as from experience. We paint those qualities which we do not possess.
[Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Prudence," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).]
Ralph Waldo Emerson :
Art is a jealous mistress, and, if a man have a genius for painting, poetry, music, architecture or philosophy, he makes a bad husband and an ill provider.
[Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. The Conduct of Life, "Wealth," (1860).]
Read more quotations about / on: husband, music, poetry
Oscar Wilde :
Every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not of the sitter.
[Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Basil Hallward, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 1 (1891).]
Henry David Thoreau :
Nature is a personality so vast and universal that we have never seen one of her features. The walker in the familiar fields which stretch around my native town sometimes finds himself in another land than is described in their owners' deeds, as it were in some faraway field on the confines of the actual Concord, where her jurisdiction ceases, and the idea which the word Concord suggests ceases to be suggested. These farms which I have myself surveyed, these bounds which I have set up, appear dimly still as through a mist; but they have no chemistry to fix them; they fade from the surface of the glass, and the picture which the painter painted stands out dimly from beneath. The world with which we are commonly acquainted leaves no trace, and it will have no anniversary.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Walking" (1862), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 242, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
Read more quotations about / on: anniversary
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe :
Every day one should at least listen to a little song, read a good poem, look at a fine painting, and, if possible, say a few reasonable words.
[Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749-1832), German poet, dramatist. Serlo, in Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, bk. V, ch. 1 (1795-1796).]
Read more quotations about / on: poem, song
Henry David Thoreau :
Have you ever read Ruskin's books? If not, I would recommend you to try the second and third volumes (not parts) of his "Modern Painters." I am now reading the fourth, and have read most of his other books lately. They are singularly good and encouraging, though not without crudeness and bigotry. The themes in the volumes referred to are Infinity, Beauty, Imagination, Love of Nature, etc.,—all treated in a very living manner. I am rather surprised by them. It is remarkable that these things should be said with reference to painting chiefly, rather than literature. The "Seven Lamps of Architecture," too, is made of good stuff; but, as I remember, there is too much about art in it for me and the Hottentots. We want to know about matters and things in general. Our house is as yet a hut.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, November 16, 1857, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 319, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
Ralph Waldo Emerson :
We know that madness belongs to love,—what power to paint a vile object in hues of heaven.
[Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Fate," The Conduct of Life (1860).]
Read more quotations about / on: heaven, power, love
John Ruskin :
I have not written in vain if I have heretofore done anything towards diminishing the reputation of the Renaissance landscape painting.
[John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. I, ch. 1 (1851).]
[Hata Bildir]