200 match(es) found in quotations

Philip Larkin :
And girls you have to tell to pull their socks up Are those whose pants you'd most like to pull down.
[Philip Larkin (1922-1986), British poet. "Administration."]
William Blake :
The hum of multitudes was there, but multitudes of lambs, Thousands of little boys and girls raising their innocent hands.
[William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. Holy Thursday (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.]
Dorothy Parker :
Men seldom make passes At girls who wear glasses.
[Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. News Item, Enough Rope (1926).]
Robert Louis Stevenson :
And tell the other girls and boys Not to meddle with my toys.
[Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish author. When I am grown to man's estate (l. 3-4). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1973) Oxford University Press.]
James Joyce :
O that awful deepdown torrent O and the sea and the sea crimson sometimes like fire and the glorious sunsets and the figtrees in the Alameda gardens yes and all the queer little streets and the pink and blue and yellow houses and the rosegardens and the jessamine and geraniums and cactuses and Gibraltar as a girl where I was a Flower of the mountain yes when I put the rose in my hair like the Andalusian girls used or shall I wear a red yes and how he kissed me under the Moorish wall and I thought well as well him as another and then I asked him with my eyes to ask again yes and then he asked me would I yes to say yes my mountain flower and first I put my arms around him yes and drew him down to me so he could feel my breasts all perfume yes and his heart was going like mad and yes I said yes I will Yes.
[James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 18, "Penelope," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Molly Bloom merges in her memories her first lover on Gibraltar and the day of Leopold Bloom's proposal on Howth Hill near Dublin.]
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Henry David Thoreau :
Society is commonly too cheap. We meet at very short intervals, not having had time to acquire any new value for each other. We meet at meals three times a day, and give each other a new taste of that old musty cheese that we are. We have had to agree on a certain set of rules, called etiquette and politeness, to make this frequent meeting tolerable and that we need not come to open war. We meet at the post-office, and at the sociable, and about the fireside every night; we live thick and are in each other's way, and stumble over one another, and I think that we thus lose some respect for one another. Certainly less frequency would suffice for all important and hearty communications. Consider the girls in a factory,—never alone, hardly in their dreams. It would be better if there were but one inhabitant to a square mile, as where I live. The value of a man is not in his skin, that we should touch him.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 151, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
William Butler Yeats :
Two girls in silk kimonos, both Beautiful, one a gazelle.
[William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet. In Memory of Eva Gore-Booth and Con Markiewicz (l. 19-20). . . The Collected Poems of W. B. Yeats. Richard J. Finneran, ed. (1989) Macmillan.]
Read more quotations about / on: beautiful
Phyllis McGinley :
The knowingness of little girls Is hidden underneath their curls.
[Phyllis McGinley (1905-1978), U.S. poet, author. What Every Woman Knows, Times Three (1960).]
Philip Larkin :
Boys dream of native girls who bring breadfruit, Whatever they are....
[Philip Larkin (1922-1986), British poet. "Breadfruit."]
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Anne Sexton :
The parasol girls slept, sun-sitting their lovely years.
[Anne Sexton (1928-1974), U.S. poet. "The Kite."]
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