200 match(es) found in quotations


Quotations
Geoffrey Chaucer :
And therfore, at the kynges court, my brother, Ech man for hymself, ther is noon oother.
[Geoffrey Chaucer (1340-1400), British poet. The Canterbury Tales, Arcite, in "The Knight's Tale," l. 1181-2 (c. 1387-1400), repr. In The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, ed. Alfred W. Pollard, et al. (1898).]
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Philip Larkin :
And seniors grow tomorrow From the juniors today, And even swimming groups can fade, Games mistresses turn grey.
[Philip Larkin (1922-1986), British poet. "The School in August."]
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Henry David Thoreau :
He may travel who can subsist on the wild fruits and game of the most cultivated country.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 324, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
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Percy Bysshe Shelley :
War is the statesman's game, the priest's delight, The lawyer's jest, the hired assassin's trade.
[Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Queen Mab, pt. 4, l. 168-9 (1812).]
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Philip Larkin :
It used to make me throw up, These mawkish nursery games: O when will England grow up?
[Philip Larkin (1922-1986), British poet. "Naturally the Foundation will Bear Your Expenses."]
John Gay :
Gamesters and highwaymen are generally very good to their whores, but they are very devils to their wives.
[John Gay (1685-1732), British dramatist. Peachum, in The Beggar's Opera, act 1, sc. 4.]
Henry David Thoreau :
The kings of England formerly had their forests "to hold the king's game," for sport or food, sometimes destroying villages to create or extend them; and I think that they were impelled by a true instinct. Why should not we, who have renounced the king's authority, have our national preserves, where no villages need be destroyed, in which the bear and panther, and some even of the hunter race, may still exist, and not be "civilized off the face of the earth,"Mour forests, not to hold the king's game merely, but to hold and preserve the king himself also, the lord of creation,—not for idle sport or food, but for inspiration and our own true recreation? or shall we, like the villains, grub them all up, poaching on our own national domains?
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Chesuncook" (1858) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 173, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
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Henry David Thoreau :
They mistake who assert that the Yankee has few amusements, because he has not so many public holidays, and men and boys do not play so many games as they do in England, for here the more primitive but solitary amusements of hunting, fishing, and the like have not yet given place to the former. Almost every New England boy among my contemporaries shouldered a fowling-piece between the ages of ten and fourteen; and his hunting and fishing grounds were not limited, like the preserves of an English nobleman, but were more boundless even than those of a savage. No wonder, then, that he did not oftener stay to play on the common. But already a change is taking place, owing, not to an increased humanity, but to an increased scarcity of game, for perhaps the hunter is the greatest friend of the animals hunted, not excepting the Humane Society.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 233, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
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Henry David Thoreau :
It was a pretty game, played on the smooth surface of the pond, a man against a loon.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 260, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
Henry David Thoreau :
A stereotyped but unconscious despair is concealed even under what are called the games and amusements of mankind.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Economy," Walden (1854).]
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