200 match(es) found in quotations


Quotations
Oliver Goldsmith :
I love everything that's old: old friends, old times, old manners, old books, old wines; and, I believe, Dorothy, you'll own I have been pretty fond of an old wife.
[Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. Hardcastle, in She Stoops to Conquer, act 1, sc. 1 (1773).]
Read more quotations about / on: believe, love
Oliver Goldsmith :
I love everything that's old: old friends, old times, old manners, old books, old wines; and, I believe, Dorothy, you'll own I have been pretty fond of an old wife.
[Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. Hardcastle, in She Stoops to Conquer, act. 1, sc. 1.]
Read more quotations about / on: believe, love
Samuel Johnson :
If I had no duties, and no reference to futurity, I would spend my life in driving briskly in a post-chaise with a pretty woman.
[Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, Sept. 19, 1777 (1791).]
Read more quotations about / on: woman, life
Gertrude Stein :
Human beings are interested in two things. They are interested in the reality and interested in telling about it.
[Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author and patron of the arts; relocated to France. As quoted in What Are Masterpieces, afterword, by Robert Haas (1970). Said in a January 1946 interview with Haas.]
Francis Thompson :
O world invisible, we view thee, O world intangible, we touch thee, O world unknowable, we know thee, Inapprehensible, we clutch thee!
[Francis Thompson (1859-1907), British poet. Athenaeum (London, Aug. 8, 1909). "The Kingdom of God (In No Strange Land)," st. 1, Collected Works of Francis Thompson, vol. 2, ed. Wilfred Meynell (1913). Opening lines.]
Read more quotations about / on: world
Robert Louis Stevenson :
Well, well, Henry James is pretty good, though he is of the nineteenth century, and that glaringly.
[Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), Scottish novelist, essayist, poet. Letter, March 1889, to Henry James. The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson, vol. 2 (1899).]
Ambrose Bierce :
Heaven lies about us in our infancy ... and the world begins lying about us pretty soon afterward.
[Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906). A cynical comment on Wordsworth's famous line on "childhood."]
Read more quotations about / on: heaven, world
Henry David Thoreau :
Look not to legislatures and churches for your guidance, nor to any soulless incorporated bodies, but to inspirited or inspired ones.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Last Days of John Brown" (1860), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 446, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
Anthony Cavuoti :
What if your awareness was more sensitive and your brain development reflected this. As well as your entire way of perceiving and reacting to the world. What if you were first born a chrysalis instead of a inchworm. In a state of evolution where most are inch worms in very very few become butterflies. In the culture of the inchworm you would appear to be quite insufficient. The demands of your environment will force you to come out of your chrysalis. In many ways you would still be an inchworm but you will still have unformed appendages that are the precursors to being a butterfly which would simply be a hindrance in your struggle to adapt and compete and being an inchworm. Intuitively you know that parts of you will be lost if you succeed and by your very success you would have failed so how do you adopt to and be part of the transformation which you inherently are. How do you potentiate yourself in a environment that sees your strengths as a deficiency or some sort of character fault. Hence the struggles and the Paradox of being dyslexic. I wish to provide a dynamic Matrix of a chrysalis in our culture so dyslexics could flourish. Many wise people will appreciate the dyslexic, they will see their unique attributes, orientation and perceptions as part of a greater phenomenon that enriches are human conditions in ways that cannot be predicted. At present our survival depends on embracing diversity so we could change our destructive course while maintaining our vital functions. This hyperbole does speak to the heart of the matter for it shows the almost disparaging task dyslexic face in fulfilling their potentials and in being true to themselves. For they have many diverse and wide intellectual and creative powers but the established system that systematically weeds them out, and this happens in such an matter of fact and overwhelming way whereby they believe that they are failures. I could honestly speak to how untrue this is. opyright © 2016 Anthony Cavuoti All Rights Reserved
[My answer to what it's like to be dyslexic]
Henry David Thoreau :
In him the animal man chiefly was developed. In physical endurance and contentment he was cousin to the pine and the rock.... But the intellectual and what is called spiritual man in him were slumbering as in an infant. He had been instructed only in that innocent and ineffectual way in which the Catholic priests teach the aborigines, by which the pupil is never educated to the degree of consciousness, but only to the degree of trust and reverence, and a child is not made a man, but kept a child.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, pp. 162-163, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
Read more quotations about / on: child, animal, trust
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