200 match(es) found in quotations


Quotations
Oliver Goldsmith :
I love everything that's old: old friends, old times, old manners, old books, old wines; and, I believe, Dorothy, you'll own I have been pretty fond of an old wife.
[Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. Hardcastle, in She Stoops to Conquer, act 1, sc. 1 (1773).]
Read more quotations about / on: believe, love
Oliver Goldsmith :
I love everything that's old: old friends, old times, old manners, old books, old wines; and, I believe, Dorothy, you'll own I have been pretty fond of an old wife.
[Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. Hardcastle, in She Stoops to Conquer, act. 1, sc. 1.]
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Samuel Johnson :
If I had no duties, and no reference to futurity, I would spend my life in driving briskly in a post-chaise with a pretty woman.
[Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, Sept. 19, 1777 (1791).]
Read more quotations about / on: woman, life
Francis Thompson :
O world invisible, we view thee, O world intangible, we touch thee, O world unknowable, we know thee, Inapprehensible, we clutch thee!
[Francis Thompson (1859-1907), British poet. Athenaeum (London, Aug. 8, 1909). "The Kingdom of God (In No Strange Land)," st. 1, Collected Works of Francis Thompson, vol. 2, ed. Wilfred Meynell (1913). Opening lines.]
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Ralph Waldo Emerson :
Is a man too strong and fierce for society, and by temper and position a bad citizen,—a morose ruffian, with a dash of the pirate in him;Mnature sends him a troop of pretty sons and daughters, who are getting along in the dame's classes at the village school, and love and fear for them smooths his grim scowl to courtesy. Thus she contrives to intenerate the granite and the feldspar, takes the boar out and puts the lamb in, and keeps her balance true.
[Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Compensation," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).]
Read more quotations about / on: school, fear, love
William Butler Yeats :
We too had many pretty toys when young; A law indifferent to blame or praise, To bribe or threat; habits that made old wrong Melt down, as it were wax in the sun's rays; Public opinion ripening for so long We thought it would outlive all future days.
[William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "Nineteen Hundred and Nineteen."]
Read more quotations about / on: future, sun
Ambrose Bierce :
Heaven lies about us in our infancy ... and the world begins lying about us pretty soon afterward.
[Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906). A cynical comment on Wordsworth's famous line on "childhood."]
Read more quotations about / on: heaven, world
William Shakespeare :
Poor harmless fly, That with his pretty buzzing melody Came here to make us merry. And thou hast killed him!
[William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Titus, in Titus Andronicus, act 3, sc. 2, l. 63-5. To his brother Marcus; Titus is going mad.]
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William Shakespeare :
Thou wast a pretty fellow when thou hadst no need to care for her frowning; now thou art an O without a figure. I am better than thou art now; I am a fool, thou art nothing.
[William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Fool, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 4, l. 191-4. To King Lear, who has given his lands to his daughters; an O is nothing without another figure in front of it.]
Henry David Thoreau :
Look not to legislatures and churches for your guidance, nor to any soulless incorporated bodies, but to inspirited or inspired ones.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Last Days of John Brown" (1860), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 446, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
[Hata Bildir]