200 match(es) found in quotations


Quotations
Oliver Goldsmith :
I love everything that's old: old friends, old times, old manners, old books, old wines; and, I believe, Dorothy, you'll own I have been pretty fond of an old wife.
[Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. Hardcastle, in She Stoops to Conquer, act 1, sc. 1 (1773).]
Read more quotations about / on: believe, love
Oliver Goldsmith :
I love everything that's old: old friends, old times, old manners, old books, old wines; and, I believe, Dorothy, you'll own I have been pretty fond of an old wife.
[Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. Hardcastle, in She Stoops to Conquer, act. 1, sc. 1.]
Read more quotations about / on: believe, love
Samuel Johnson :
If I had no duties, and no reference to futurity, I would spend my life in driving briskly in a post-chaise with a pretty woman.
[Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, Sept. 19, 1777 (1791).]
Read more quotations about / on: woman, life
Anthony Cavuoti :
What if your awareness was more sensitive and your brain development reflected this. As well as your entire way of perceiving and reacting to the world. What if you were first born a chrysalis instead of a inchworm. In a state of evolution where most are inch worms in very very few become butterflies. In the culture of the inchworm you would appear to be quite insufficient. The demands of your environment will force you to come out of your chrysalis. In many ways you would still be an inchworm but you will still have unformed appendages that are the precursors to being a butterfly which would simply be a hindrance in your struggle to adapt and compete and being an inchworm. Intuitively you know that parts of you will be lost if you succeed and by your very success you would have failed so how do you adopt to and be part of the transformation which you inherently are. How do you potentiate yourself in a environment that sees your strengths as a deficiency or some sort of character fault. Hence the struggles and the Paradox of being dyslexic. I wish to provide a dynamic Matrix of a chrysalis in our culture so dyslexics could flourish. Many wise people will appreciate the dyslexic, they will see their unique attributes, orientation and perceptions as part of a greater phenomenon that enriches are human conditions in ways that cannot be predicted. At present our survival depends on embracing diversity so we could change our destructive course while maintaining our vital functions. This hyperbole does speak to the heart of the matter for it shows the almost disparaging task dyslexic face in fulfilling their potentials and in being true to themselves. For they have many diverse and wide intellectual and creative powers but the established system that systematically weeds them out, and this happens in such an matter of fact and overwhelming way whereby they believe that they are failures. I could honestly speak to how untrue this is. opyright © 2016 Anthony Cavuoti All Rights Reserved
[My answer to what it's like to be dyslexic]
Henry David Thoreau :
In him the animal man chiefly was developed. In physical endurance and contentment he was cousin to the pine and the rock.... But the intellectual and what is called spiritual man in him were slumbering as in an infant. He had been instructed only in that innocent and ineffectual way in which the Catholic priests teach the aborigines, by which the pupil is never educated to the degree of consciousness, but only to the degree of trust and reverence, and a child is not made a man, but kept a child.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, pp. 162-163, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
Read more quotations about / on: child, animal, trust
Gerard Manley Hopkins :
You do not mean by mystery what a Catholic does. You mean an interesting uncertainty: the uncertainty ceasing interest ceases also.... But a Catholic by mystery means an incomprehensible certainty: without certainty, without formulation there is no interest;... the clearer the formulation the greater the interest.
[Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), British poet, Jesuit priest. letter, Oct. 24, 1883, to Robert Bridges. Gerard Manley Hopkins: Selected Letters, ed. Catherine Phillips (1991).]
Henry David Thoreau :
What meant the fathers by establishing this perfectly living institution before the church,—this institution which needs no repairing nor repainting, which is continually enlarged and repaired by its growth?... Verily these maples are cheap preachers, permanently settled, which preach their half-century, and century, aye, and century-and-a-half sermons, with constantly increasing unction and influence, ministering to many generations of men; and the least we can do is to supply them with suitable colleagues as they grow infirm.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Autumnal Tints" (1862), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, pp. 277-278, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
Henry David Thoreau :
While lying there listening to the Indians, I amused myself with trying to guess at their subject by their gestures, or some proper name introduced. There can be no more startling evidence of their being a distinct and comparatively aboriginal race than to hear this unaltered Indian language, which the white man cannot speak nor understand. We may suspect change and deterioration in almost every other particular but the language which is so wholly unintelligible to us. It took me by surprise, though I had found so many arrowheads, and convinced me that the Indian was not the invention of historians and poets.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Chesuncook" (1858) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 151, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
Read more quotations about / on: change
Henry David Thoreau :
The Indians invited us to lodge with them, but my companion inclined to go to the log camp on the carry. This camp was close and dirty, and had an ill smell, and I preferred to accept the Indians' offer, if we did not make a camp for ourselves; for, though they were dirty, too, they were more in the open air, and were much more agreeable, and even refined company, than the lumberers.... So we went to the Indians' camp or wigwam.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Chesuncook" (1858) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 148, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
Ralph Waldo Emerson :
The worst feature in the history of those years, is, that no man spake for the Indian. When the Dutch, or the French, or the English royalist disagreed with the Colony, there was always found a Dutch or French, or tory party,—an earnest minority,—to keep things from extremity. But the Indian seemed to inspire such a feeling as the wild beast inspires in the people near his den. It is the misfortune of Concord to have permitted a disgraceful outrage upon the friendly Indians settled within its limits, in February, 1676, which ended in their forcible expulsion from town.
[Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, September 12, 1835, on the occasion of the second centennial anniversary of the town of Concord. "Historical Discourse at Concord," Miscellanies (1883, repr. 1903).]
Read more quotations about / on: history, people
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