200 match(es) found in quotations


Quotations
Charles Baudelaire :
What is exhilarating in bad taste is the aristocratic pleasure of giving offense.
[Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. Squibs, Intimate Journals, sct. 18 (1887), trans. by Christopher Isherwood (1930), rev. Don Bachardy (1989).]
Henry David Thoreau :
Moral reform is the effort to throw off sleep.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 100, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
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William Shakespeare :
I cannot be a man with wishing, therefore I will die a woman with grieving.
[William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 1, l. 322-3. Addressing Benedick, in the hope of persuading him to challenge Claudio.]
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William Shakespeare :
Reputation is an idle and most false imposition; oft got without merit, and lost without deserving.
[William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 2, sc. 3, l. 268-70. "Imposition" means what is attributed to someone by other people.]
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Sophocles :
Despair often breeds disease.
[Sophocles (497-406/5 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 585 (Tyro).]
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Ambrose Bierce :
To apologize is to lay the foundation for a future offense.
[Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).]
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Benjamin Franklin :
Where there's marriage without love, there will be love without marriage.
[Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Poor Richard's Almanac, May (1734).]
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William Shakespeare :
There's not one wise man among twenty that will praise himself.
[William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 5, sc. 2, l. 73-5. To Benedick, varying the proverb, "He must praise himself since no one else will."]
Ralph Waldo Emerson :
Leave your theory, as Joseph his coat in the hand of the harlot, and flee.
[Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Self-Reliance," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).]
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Sophocles :
Much wisdom often goes with brevity of speech.
[Sophocles (497-406/5 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 89 (Aletes).]
[Hata Bildir]