200 match(es) found in quotations

Charles Baudelaire :
Who among us has not, in moments of ambition, dreamt of the miracle of a form of poetic prose, musical but without rhythm and rhyme, both supple and staccato enough to adapt itself to the lyrical movements of our souls, the undulating movements of our reveries, and the convulsive movements of our consciences? This obsessive ideal springs above all from frequent contact with enormous cities, from the junction of their innumerable connections.
[Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 1, "Shorter Prose Poems," ed. Yves-GĂ©rard le Dantec, revised by Claude Pichois (1953). Dedication of Le Spleen de Paris, La Presse (Paris, August 26, 1862).]
John Keats :
Give me books, fruit, French wine and fine weather and a little music out of doors, played by someone I do not know.... I admire lolling on a lawn by a water-lilied pond to eat white currants and see goldfish: and go to the fair in the evening if I'm good. There is not hope for that—one is sure to get into some mess before evening.
[John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, August 28, 1819, to his sister Fanny Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 146, ed. Frederick Page (1954).]
Read more quotations about / on: weather, music, water, hope
Joseph Addison :
Musick is certainly a very agreeable Entertainment, but if it would take the entire Possession of our Ears, if it would make us incapable of hearing Sense, if it would exclude Arts that have a much greater Tendency to the Refinement of human Nature; I must confess I would allow it no better Quarter than Plato has done, who banishes it out of his Common-wealth.
[Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British author. The Spectator, No. 18 (1711).]
Read more quotations about / on: nature
Ralph Waldo Emerson :
In different hours, a man represents each of several of his ancestors, as if there were seven or eight of us rolled up in each man's skin,—seven or eight ancestors at least, and they constitute the variety of notes for that new piece of music which his life is.
[Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Fate," The Conduct of Life (1860).]
Read more quotations about / on: music, life
Charles Baudelaire :
The dance can reveal everything mysterious that is hidden in music, and it has the additional merit of being human and palpable. Dancing is poetry with arms and legs.
[Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. La Fanfarlo (1847), trans. 1986.]
Read more quotations about / on: dance, music, poetry
Ralph Waldo Emerson :
Flowers and fruits are always fit presents; flowers, because they are a proud assertion that a ray of beauty outvalues all of the utilities of the world. These gay natures contrast with the somewhat stern countenance of ordinary nature: they are like music heard out of a work-house.
[Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Gifts," Essays, Second Series (1844).]
Read more quotations about / on: music, beauty, house, work, nature, world
Ralph Waldo Emerson :
Men are conservatives when they are least vigorous, or when they are most luxurious. They are conservatives after dinner, or before taking their rest; when they are sick, or aged: in the morning, or when their intellect or their conscience has been aroused, when they hear music, or when they read poetry, they are radicals.
[Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Lecture, March 3, 1884, in Amory Hall, Boston, Massachusetts. "New England Reformers," Essays, Second Series (1844).]
Read more quotations about / on: sick, music, poetry
Arthur William Edgar O'Shaughnessy :
We are the music-makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams, Wandering by lone sea-breakers, And sitting by desolate streams; World-losers and world-forsakers, On whom the pale moon gleams:
[Arthur William Edgar O'Shaughnessy (1844-1881), British poet. Ode (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.]
Read more quotations about / on: moon, music, world, sea
William Shakespeare :
It is as easy as lying. Govern these ventages with your fingers and thumbs, give it breath with your mouth, and it will discourse most eloquent music.
[William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 2, l. 357-9. To Guildenstern, who cannot play the recorder; "ventages" are stops on the instrument.]
Read more quotations about / on: music
Henry David Thoreau :
There was something refreshingly and wildly musical to my ears in the very name of the white man's canoe, reminding me of Charlevoix and Canadian Voyageurs. The batteau is a sort of mongrel between the canoe and the boat, a fur-trader's boat.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Ktaadn" (1848) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 6, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
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