200 match(es) found in quotations


Quotations
Hilda Doolittle :
I watch the white stars darken; the day comes and the white stars dim and lessen and the lights fade in the city.
[Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961), U.S. poet. "The Shepherd."]
Read more quotations about / on: city
June Jordan :
There is a man who exists as one of the most popular objects of leadership, legislation, and quasi-literature in the history of all men.... This man, that object of attention, attack, and vast activity, cannot make himself be heard, let alone to understood. He has never been listened to.... That man is Black and alive in white America where the media of communication do not allow the delivery of his own voice, his own desires, his own rage.
[June Jordan (b. 1939), U.S. poet, civil rights activist. repr. In Moving Towards Home: Political Essays (1989). "On Listening: A Good Way to Hear," Nation (New York, 1967).]
Read more quotations about / on: america, black, history, alone
June Jordan :
In America, you can segregate the people, but the problems will travel. From slavery to equal rights, from state suppression of dissent to crime, drugs and unemployment, I can't think of a supposedly Black issue that hasn't wasted the original Black target group and then spread like measles to outlying white experience.
[June Jordan (b. 1939), U.S. poet, civil rights activist. "Problems of Language in a Democratic State," Moving Towards Home: Political Essays (1982, repr. 1989).]
Read more quotations about / on: black, travel, america, people
John Keats :
Give me books, fruit, French wine and fine weather and a little music out of doors, played by someone I do not know.... I admire lolling on a lawn by a water-lilied pond to eat white currants and see goldfish: and go to the fair in the evening if I'm good. There is not hope for that—one is sure to get into some mess before evening.
[John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, August 28, 1819, to his sister Fanny Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 146, ed. Frederick Page (1954).]
Read more quotations about / on: weather, music, water, hope
Henry David Thoreau :
The white man's mullein soon reigned in Indian corn-fields, and sweet-scented English grasses clothed the new soil. Where, then, could the red man set his foot?
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 52, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
Read more quotations about / on: red
Langston Hughes :
So will my page be colored that I write? Being me, it will not be white. But it will be a part of you, instructor. You are white— yet a part of me, as I am a part of you.
[Langston Hughes (1902-1967), U.S. poet. Theme for English B (l. 27-32). . . Selected Poems of Langston Hughes. (1959) Vintage Books.]
June Jordan :
Lately ... Americans have begun to understand that trouble does not start somewhere on the other side of town. It seems to originate inside the absolute middle of the homemade cherry pie. In our history, the state has failed to respond to the weak.... You could be white, male, Presbyterian and heterosexual besides, but if you get fired or if you get sick tomorrow, you might as well be Black, for all the state will want to hear from you.
[June Jordan (b. 1939), U.S. poet, civil rights activist. "Problems of Language in a Democratic State," Moving Towards Home: Political Essays (1989, first published 1982).]
Read more quotations about / on: tomorrow, sick, black, history
Hilda Doolittle :
The white stretch of its white beach, curved as the moon crescent or ivory when some fine hand chisels it.
[Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961), U.S. poet. "Thetis."]
Read more quotations about / on: beach, moon
Henry David Thoreau :
The white man comes, pale as the dawn, with a load of thought, with a slumbering intelligence as a fire raked up, knowing well what he knows, not guessing but calculating; strong in community, yielding obedience to authority; of experienced race; of wonderful, wonderful common sense; dull but capable, slow but persevering, severe but just, of little humor but genuine; a laboring man, despising game and sport; building a house that endures, a framed house. He buys the Indian's moccasins and baskets, then buys his hunting-grounds, and at length forgets where he is buried and plows up his bones.
[Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, pp. 52-53, Houghton Mifflin (1906).]
Read more quotations about / on: house, hunting, humor, fire
June Jordan :
When that devil's bullet lodged itself inside the body of Martin Luther King, he had already begun an astonishing mobilization of poor, Black, white, latino Americans who had nothing to lose. They would challenge our government to eliminate exploitative, merciless, and war-mongering policies, nationwide, or else "tie up the country" through "means of civil disobedience." Dr. King intended to organize those legions into "coercive direct actions" that would make of Babylon a dysfunctional behemoth begging for relief. Is it any wonder he was killed?
[June Jordan (b. 1939), U.S. poet, civil rights activist. lecture, Jan. 20, 1987, Stanford University, California. "The Mountain and the Man Who Was Not God," Moving Towards Home: Political Essays (1989).]
Read more quotations about / on: black, war
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