Treasure Island

Sir Walter Raleigh

(1552 - 1618 / Devon / England)

Quotations

  • ''But could youth last, and love still breed,
    Had joys no date, nor age no need,
    Then these delights my mind might move
    To live with thee and be thy Love.''
    Sir Walter Raleigh (1552?-1618), British poet. The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd (l. 21-24). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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  • ''Thy gowns, thy shoes,thy beds of roses,
    Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies,
    Soon break, soon wither—soon forgotten,
    In folly ripe,in reason rotten.''
    Sir Walter Raleigh (1552?-1618), British poet. The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd (l. 13-16). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''Give me my scallop-shell of quiet,
    My staff of faith to walk upon,
    My scrip of joy, immortal diet,
    My bottle of salvation,
    My gown of glory, hope's true gage,
    And thus I'll take my pilgrimage.''
    Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618), British author, soldier, explorer. The Passionate Man's Pilgrimage, The Poems of Sir Walter Raleigh, ed. Agnes M. Latham (1951). Poem written while waiting execution on charges of treason against James I. The scallop-shell was the symbol worn by pilgrims. Raleigh was reprieved, though imprisoned for the next 12 years, and finally condemned and beheaded in 1616.
  • ''Just at the stroke when my veins start and spread,
    Set on my soul an everlasting head.
    Then am I ready, like a palmer fit,
    To tread those blest paths which before I writ.''
    Sir Walter Raleigh (1552?-1618), British poet. The Passionate Man's Pilgrimage (l. 55-58). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
  • ''The sun may set and rise:
    But we contrariwise
    Sleep after our short light
    One everlasting night.''
    Sir Walter Raleigh (1552?-1618), British poet. The Sun May Set and Rise (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Verse in English Translation, The. Charles Tomlinson, ed. (1980) Oxford University Press.
  • ''I wish I loved the Human Race;
    I wish I loved its silly face;
    I wish I liked the way it walks;
    I wish I liked the way it talks;
    And when I'm introduced to one
    I wish I thought What Jolly Fun!''
    Sir Walter Raleigh (1861-1922), British scholar, critic. The Wishes of an Elderly Man, Laughter from a Cloud (1923).
  • ''Green springs the tree, hemp grows, the wag is wild,
    But when they meet, it makes the timber rot;
    It frets the halter, and it chokes the child.''
    Sir Walter Raleigh (1552?-1618), British poet. Three Things There Be That Prosper All Apace (l. 10-12). . . Oxford Book of Short Poems, The. P. J. Kavanagh and James Michie, eds. Oxford University Press.
  • ''And they be these: the wood, the weed, the wag.
    The wood is that which makes the gallow tree;
    The weed is that which strings the hangman's bag;''
    Sir Walter Raleigh (1552?-1618), British poet. Three Things There Be That Prosper All Apace (l. 5-7). . . Oxford Book of Short Poems, The. P. J. Kavanagh and James Michie, eds. Oxford University Press.
  • ''Our graves that hide us from the searching sun
    Are like drawn curtains when the play is done.
    Thus march we, playing, to our latest rest,
    Only, we die in earnest—that's no jest.''
    Sir Walter Raleigh (1552?-1618), British poet. What Is Our Life? A Play of Passion (l. 7-10). . . Oxford Book of Short Poems, The. P. J. Kavanagh and James Michie, eds. Oxford University Press.
  • ''What is our life? a play of passion;
    Our mirth the music of division;
    Our mothers' wombs the tiring-houses be
    Where we are dressed for this short comedy.''
    Sir Walter Raleigh (1552?-1618), British poet. What Is Our Life? A Play of Passion (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Short Poems, The. P. J. Kavanagh and James Michie, eds. Oxford University Press.

Read more quotations »

His Pilgrimage

GIVE me my scallop-shell of quiet,
   My staff of faith to walk upon,
My scrip of joy, immortal diet,
   My bottle of salvation,
My gown of glory, hope's true gage;
And thus I'll take my pilgrimage.

Blood must be my body's balmer;
   No other balm will there be given:

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