Treasure Island

Sir Walter Scott

(1771-1832 / Edinburgh / Scotland)

Quotations

  • ''A lawyer without history or literature is a mechanic, a mere working mason; if he possesses some knowledge of these, he may venture to call himself an architect.''
    Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), Scottish novelist, poet. Guy Mannering, ch. 37 (1815).
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  • ''The priest and bridegroom wait the bride
    And dame and knight are there.
    They sought her baith by bower and ha
    The ladie was not seen!
    She's o'er the Border and awa'
    Wi' Jock of Hazeldean.''
    Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), Scottish novelist, poet. Jock of Hazeldean (l. 27-32). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''With a smile on her lips, and a tear in her eye.''
    Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), Scottish novelist, poet. Marmion. . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
  • '''Twas Christmas broach'd the mightiest ale;
    'Twas Christmas told the merriest tale;
    A Christmas gambol oft could cheer
    The poor man's heart through half the year.''
    Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), Scottish novelist, poet. Marmion, cto. 6, introduction (1808).
  • ''Each age has deemed the new-born year
    The fittest time for festal cheer.''
    Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), Scottish novelist, poet. Marmion, cto. 6, introduction.
  • ''Oh, young Lochinvar is come out of the West,—
    Through all the wide Border his steed was the best,
    And, save his good broadsword, he weapon had none,—
    He rode all unarmed, and he rode all alone.
    So faithful in love, and so dauntless in war,
    There never was knight like the young Lochinvar.''
    Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), Scottish novelist, poet. Marmion. . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Where shall the traitor rest,
    He, the deceiver,
    Who could win maiden's breast,
    Ruin, and leave her?
    In the lost battle,
    Borne down by the flying,
    Where mingles war's rattle
    With groans of the dying;''
    Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), Scottish novelist, poet. Marmion. . . Golden Treasury of the Best Songs & Lyrical Poems in the English Language. Francis Turner Palgrave, comp. With a fifth book selected by John Press. (5th ed., 1964) Oxford University Press.
  • ''O, what a tangled web we weave,
    When first we practise to deceive!''
    Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), Scottish novelist, poet. Marmion, cto. 6, st. 17 (1808). J.R. Pope, in A Word of Encouragement, added to this the lines, "But when we've practised quite a while/How vastly we improve our style."
  • ''Come as the winds come, when
    Forests are rended,
    Come as the waves come, when
    Navies are stranded:''
    Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), Scottish novelist, poet. Pibroch of Donuil Dhu (l. 27-30). . . Golden Treasury of the Best Songs & Lyrical Poems in the English Language. Francis Turner Palgrave, comp. With a fifth book selected by John Press. (5th ed., 1964) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Come away, come away,
    Hark to the summons!
    Come in your war-array,
    Gentles and commons.''
    Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), Scottish novelist, poet. Pibroch of Donuil Dhu (l. 5-8). . . Golden Treasury of the Best Songs & Lyrical Poems in the English Language. Francis Turner Palgrave, comp. With a fifth book selected by John Press. (5th ed., 1964) Oxford University Press.

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Country Guy

Ah! County Guy, the hour is nigh,
The sun has left the lea,
The orange flower perfumes the bower,
The breeze is on the sea.
The lark his lay who thrill'd all day
Sits hush'd his partner nigh:
Breeze, bird, and flower confess the hour,
But where is County Guy?

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