Thomas Campbell

(1777-1844 / Glasgow / Scotland)

Quotations

  • ''O Star-eyed Science! hast thou wandered there,
    To waft us home the message of despair?''
    Thomas Campbell (1777-1844), Scottish poet. "Pleasures of Hope," pt. 2.
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  • ''Now Barabbas was a publisher.''
    Thomas Campbell (1777-1844), Scottish poet. Quoted in A Publisher and his Friends, vol. 1, ch. 14, Samuel Smiles (1891). parodying the gospel of John 18: 40. The joke is also ascribed to Lord Byron.
  • ''O leave this barren spot to me!
    Spare, woodman, spare the beechen tree.''
    Thomas Campbell (1777-1844), Scottish poet. repr. In Complete Poetical Works, ed. J.L. Robertson (1907). "The Beech-Tree's Petition," st. 1 (1800).
  • ''What though my wingèd hours of bliss have been,
    Like angel-visits, few and far between?''
    Thomas Campbell (1777-1844), Scottish poet. repr. In Complete Poetical Works, ed. J.L. Robertson (1907). "The Pleasures of Hope," pt. 2, l. 375-376 (1799). The image is borrowed from the Scottish poet Robert Blair (1699-1746): "The good he scorned Stalked off reluctant, like an ill-used ghost, Not to return; or if it did, its visits Like those of angels, short, and far between." The Grave, l. 586-589 (1743).
  • ''What millions died that Caesar might be great!''
    Thomas Campbell (1777-1844), Scottish poet. repr. In Complete Poetical Works, ed. J.L. Robertson (1907). "The Pleasures of Hope," pt. 2, l. 174 (1799).
  • '''Tis distance lends enchantment to the view,
    And robes the mountain in its azure hue.''
    Thomas Campbell (1777-1844), Scottish poet. repr. In Complete Poetical Works, ed. J.L. Robertson (1907). "The Pleasures of Hope," pt. 1, l. 7-8 (1799).
  • ''It may be strange—yet who would change
    Time's course to slower speeding,
    When one by one our friends have gone
    And left our bosoms bleeding?''
    Thomas Campbell (1774-1844), Scottish poet. The River of Life (l. 17-20). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
  • ''And the sentinel stars set their watch in the sky;''
    Thomas Campbell (1774-1844), Scottish poet. The Soldier's Dream (l. 2). . . Faber Popular Reciter, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Faber and Faber.
  • '''Stay—stay with us!—rest—thou art
    weary and worn!'—
    And fain was their war-broken soldier to stay;—
    But sorrow return'd with the dawning of morn,
    And the voice in my dreaming ear melted away.''
    Thomas Campbell (1774-1844), Scottish poet. The Soldier's Dream (l. 21-24). . . Faber Popular Reciter, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Faber and Faber.
  • ''Britannia needs no bulwarks,
    No towers along the steep;
    Her march is o'er the mountain-waves,
    Her home is on the deep.''
    Thomas Campbell (1774-1844), Scottish poet. Ye Mariners of England (l. 21-24). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.

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The Dirge of Wallace

When Scotland's great Regent, our warrior most dear,
The debt of his nature did pay,
T' was Edward, the cruel, had reason to fear,
And cause to be struck with dismay.

At the window of Edward the raven did croak,
Though Scotland a widow became;
Each tie of true honor to Wallace he broke-
The raven croaked "Sorrow and shame!"

[Hata Bildir]