Treasure Island

William Cowper

(26 November 1731 – 25 April 1800 / Hertfordshire)

Quotations

  • ''A fretful temper will divide
    The closest knot that may be tied,
    By ceaseless sharp corrosion;
    A temper passionate and fierce
    May suddenly your joys disperse
    At one immense explosion.''
    William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. "Friendship," (written 1781, published 1800).
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  • ''His purposes will ripen fast,
    Unfolding ev'ry hour;
    The bud may have a bitter taste,
    But sweet will be the flow'r.''
    William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. God moves in a mysterious way (l. 17-20). . . Seven Centuries of Poetry; Chaucer to Dylan Thomas. A. N. Jeffares, ed. (1955) Longmans, Green & Company.
  • ''John Gilpin was a citizen
    Of credit and renown,
    A train-band captain eke was he
    Of famous London town.''
    William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. John Gilpin (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Narrative Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1983) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Now let us sing, Long live the king,
    And Gilpin long live he;
    And when he next doth ride abroad,
    May I be there to see!''
    William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. John Gilpin (l. 249-252). . . Oxford Book of Narrative Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1983) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Mr. Grenville squeezed me by the hand again, kissed the ladies, and withdrew. He kissed likewise the maid in the kitchen, and seemed upon the whole a most loving, kissing, kind-hearted gentleman.''
    William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. Letter, March 29, 1874. Letters and Prose Writings of William Cowper, vol. 2, eds. J. King and C. Ryskamp (1981).
  • ''Man disavows, and Deity disowns me:
    Hell might afford my miseries a shelter;
    Therefore hell keeps her ever-hungry mouths all
    Bolted against me.''
    William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. Lines Written During a Period of Insanity (written 1763). The poem, one of Cowper's Sapphics, was written in 1763, a year in which Cowper made three suicide attempts, which were followed by a period of insanity and hospitalization.
  • ''God moves in a mysterious way,
    His wonders to perform;
    He plants his footsteps in the sea,
    And rides upon the storm.''
    William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. repr. In Poetical Works, ed. H.S. Milford (1934). Olney Hymns, no. 35, "Light Shining Out of Darkness," (1779).
  • ''And Satan trembles when he sees
    The weakest saint upon his knees.''
    William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. repr. In Poetical Works, ed. H.S. Milford (1934). Olney Hymns, no. 29, "Exhortation to Prayer," (1779).
  • ''Here may we prove the pow'r of pray'r,
    To strengthen faith, and sweeten care;
    To teach our faint desires to rise,
    And bring all heav'n before our eyes.''
    William Cowper (1731-1800), British hymn-writer. Published in Olney Hymns, in Three Books, London, W. Oliver (1779). "On Opening a Place for Social Prayer," hymn #XLIV, book ii, pp. 234-35, l. 13-16 (1769).
  • ''Toll for the brave—
    The brave! that are no more:
    All sunk beneath the wave,
    Fast by their native shore.''
    William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. On the Loss of the Royal George (l. 1-4). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.

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Lovest Thou Me?

(John, xxi.16)

Hark my soul! it is the Lord;
'Tis Thy Saviour, hear His word;
Jesus speaks and speaks to thee,
"Say poor sinner, lovst thou me?

"I deliver'd thee when bound,
And when bleeding, heal'd thy wound;

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