Zora Neale Hurston


Quotations

  • ''Ah done growed ten feet higher from jus' listenin' tuh you, Janie. Ah ain't satisfied wid mahself no mo'.''
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Phoeby, in Their Eyes Were Watching God, ch. 20, J.P. Lippincott (1937).
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  • ''Trees and plants always look like the people they live with, somehow.''
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Seraph on the Suwanee, ch. 1, Scribners (1948).
  • ''She had brought love to the union and he had brought a longing after the flesh.''
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Fire!! (1926). "Sweat."
  • ''Sweat, sweat, sweat! Work and sweat, cry and sweat, pray and sweat!''
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Fire!! (1926). "Sweat."
  • ''Mah sweat is done paid for this house and Ah reckon Ah kin keep on sweatin' in it.''
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Fire!! (1926). "Sweat."
  • ''The Haitian people are gentle and lovable except for their enormous and unconscious cruelty.''
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Tell My Horse, ch. 7, Lippincott, 1938.
  • ''It is a curious thing to be a woman in the Caribbean after you have been a woman in these United States.''
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Tell My Horse, ch. 5, J.P. Lippincott (1938).
  • ''A whisper ran along the edge of the dawn.''
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Tell My Horse, ch. 5, J.P. Lippincott (1938).
  • ''A thing is mighty big when time and distance cannot shrink it.''
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Tell My Horse, ch. 7, J.P. Lippincott (1938).
  • ''To avoid the consequences of posterity the mulattos give the blacks a first class letting alone. There is a frantic stampede white-ward to escape from Jamaica's black mass.''
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Tell My Horse, ch. 1, J.P. Lippincott (1938).

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