Abraham Lincoln

(12 February 1809 – 15 April 1865 / Sinking Spring Farm, Kentucky)

Abraham Lincoln Quotes

  • ''I have never had a feeling politically that did not spring from the sentiments embodied in the Declaration of Independence.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech in Independence Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Feb. 22, 1861. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 240, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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  • ''Let him have the marble monument, along with the well-assured and more enduring one in the hearts of those who love liberty, unselfishly, for all men.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to John H. Bryant, May 30, 1864, concerning Congressman Owen Lovejoy, brother of martyred abolitionist. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7, p. 366, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''I believe the declaration that "all men are created equal" is the great fundamental principle upon which our free institutions rest.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to James N. Brown, Oct. 18, 1858. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 327, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''If you can hold your present position, we shall "hive" the enemy yet.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to George B. McClellan, July 5, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 307, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''To you, more than to any others, the privilege is given, to assure that happiness [of saving the Union], and swell that grandeur, and to link your own names therewith forever.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Appeal to border state representatives to favor compensated emancipation, July 12, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 319, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Doubtless you begin to understand how disagreeable it is to me to do a thing arbitrarily, when it is unsatisfactory to others associated with me.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Winfield Scott, June 5, 1861. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 394, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''My parents were both born in Virginia, of undistinguished families—second families, perhaps I should say.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Jesse W. Fell, Dec. 20, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 511, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Almost every thing, especially of governmental policy, is an inseparable compound of the two [good and evil].''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Speech in the U.S. House of Representatives on internal improvements, June 20, 1848. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 484, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''I believe you to be a brave and a skillful soldier, which, of course, I like. I also believe you do not mix politics with your profession, in which you are right.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Joseph Hooker, Jan. 26, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 78, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990). Preliminary words to calling a general on the carpet.
  • ''The cause of civil liberty must not be surrendered at the end of one, or even one hundred defeats.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Henry Asbury, Nov. 19, 1858. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 339, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).

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Best Poem of Abraham Lincoln

My Childhood Home I See Again

I

My childhood's home I see again,
And sadden with the view;
And still, as memory crowds my brain,
There's pleasure in it too.

O Memory! thou midway world
'Twixt earth and paradise,
Where things decayed and loved ones lost
In dreamy shadows rise,

And, freed from all that's earthly vile,
Seem hallowed, pure, and bright,
Like scenes in some enchanted isle
All bathed in liquid light.

As dusky mountains please the eye
When twilight chases day;
As bugle-tones that, passing by,
In distance die away;

As leaving ...

Read the full of My Childhood Home I See Again

To Linnie

A sweet plaintive song did I hear,
And I fancied that she was the singer—
May emotions as pure, as that song set a-stir
Be the worst that the future shall bring her.

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