Abraham Lincoln

(12 February 1809 – 15 April 1865 / Sinking Spring Farm, Kentucky)

Abraham Lincoln Quotes

  • ''Twenty-two years ago Judge [then-Senator Stephen] Douglas and I first became acquainted. We were both young then; he a trifle younger than I. Even then, we were both ambitious; I, perhaps, quite as much so as he. With me, the race of ambition has been a failure—a flat failure; with him it has been one of splendid success.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. fragment on Stephen A. Douglas, Dec. 1856? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 382, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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  • ''How miserably things seem to be arranged in this world. If we have no friends, we have no pleasure; and if we have them, we are sure to lose them, and be doubly pained by the loss.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Joshua F. Speed, Feb. 25, 1842. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 281, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''The better part of one's life consists of his friendships.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Joseph Gillespie, July 13, 1849. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 57, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''My case is thrown exclusively upon the independent voters of this county, and if elected they will have conferred a favor upon me, for which I shall be unremitting in my labors to compensate.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. communication to the people of Sangamo County, Mar. 9, 1832. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 8, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Let us, therefore, study the incidents of this [war], as philosophy to learn wisdom from, and none of them as wrongs to be revenged.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. response to a serenade, Nov. 10, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 8, p. 101, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Gold is good in its place; but living, brave, patriotic men, are better than gold.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. response to a serenade, Nov. 10, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 8, p. 101, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Now that the election is over, may not all, having a common interest, re-unite in a common effort, to save our common country?''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. response to a serenade, Nov. 10, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 8, p. 101, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''No man is good enough to govern another man, without that other's consent. I say this is the leading principle—the sheet anchor of American republicanism.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Speech at Peoria, Illinois, Oct 16, 1854. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 266, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''If any personal description of me is thought desirable, it may be said, I am, in height, six feet, four inches, nearly; lean in flesh, weighing, on an average, one hundred and eighty pounds; dark complexion, with course black hair, and grey eyes—no other marks or brands recollected.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Jesse W. Fell, Dec. 20, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 511, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''In any future great national trial, compared with the men of this, we shall have as weak, and as strong; as silly and as wise; as bad and good.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. response to a serenade, Nov. 10, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 8, p. 101, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).

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Best Poem of Abraham Lincoln

My Childhood Home I See Again

I

My childhood's home I see again,
And sadden with the view;
And still, as memory crowds my brain,
There's pleasure in it too.

O Memory! thou midway world
'Twixt earth and paradise,
Where things decayed and loved ones lost
In dreamy shadows rise,

And, freed from all that's earthly vile,
Seem hallowed, pure, and bright,
Like scenes in some enchanted isle
All bathed in liquid light.

As dusky mountains please the eye
When twilight chases day;
As bugle-tones that, passing by,
In distance die away;

As leaving ...

Read the full of My Childhood Home I See Again

To Rosa

You are young, and I am older;
You are hopeful, I am not -
Enjoy life, ere it grow colder -
Pluck the roses ere they rot.

Teach your beau to heed the lay -
That sunshine soon is lost in shade -
That now's as good as any day -
To take thee, Rosa, ere she fade.

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