Abraham Lincoln

(12 February 1809 – 15 April 1865 / Sinking Spring Farm, Kentucky)

Abraham Lincoln Quotes

  • ''If he talks ambiguously—talks for his country with "buts" and "ifs" and "ands."''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Erastus Corning and others, June 12, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 265, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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  • ''I understand that it is a maxim of law, that a poor plea may be a good plea to a bad declaration.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. third debate with Stephen A. Douglas at Jonesboro, Illinois, Sep. 15, 1858. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 123, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''This morning, as for some days past, it seems exceedingly probable that this Administration will not be re-elected.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. memorandum concerning his probable failure of re-election, Aug. 23, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7, p. 514, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Stand with anybody that stands RIGHT. Stand with him while he is right and PART with him when he goes wrong.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech at Peoria, Illinois, Oct. 16, 1854. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 273, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''When I came of age I did not know much. Still somehow, I could read, write, and cipher to the Rule of Three.... The little advance I now have upon this store of education, I have picked up from time to time under the pressure of necessity.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Jesse W. Fell, Dec. 20, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 511, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''I believe each individual is naturally entitled to do as he pleases with himself and the fruit of his labor, so far as it in no wise interferes with any other man's rights.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Speech at Chicago, Illinois, July 10, 1858. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 493, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''As Labor is the common burthen of our race, so the effort of some to shift their share of the burthen on to the shoulders of others, is the great, durable, curse of the race.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. fragment on free labor, Sep. 17, 1859? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 462, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Every head should be cultivated.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. address before the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Sep. 30, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 479, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''I have heard, in such a way as to believe it, of your recently saying that both the Army and the Government needed a Dictator. Of course it was not for this, but in spite of it, that I have given you the command. Only those generals who gain success, can set up dictators.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Joseph Hooker, Jan. 26, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 78, Rutgers University Press (1955, 1990).
  • ''The people will save their government, if the government itself will allow them.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Fragment of draft of message to Congress, July 4, 1861. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 421, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).

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Best Poem of Abraham Lincoln

My Childhood Home I See Again

I

My childhood's home I see again,
And sadden with the view;
And still, as memory crowds my brain,
There's pleasure in it too.

O Memory! thou midway world
'Twixt earth and paradise,
Where things decayed and loved ones lost
In dreamy shadows rise,

And, freed from all that's earthly vile,
Seem hallowed, pure, and bright,
Like scenes in some enchanted isle
All bathed in liquid light.

As dusky mountains please the eye
When twilight chases day;
As bugle-tones that, passing by,
In distance die away;

As leaving ...

Read the full of My Childhood Home I See Again

To Linnie

A sweet plaintive song did I hear,
And I fancied that she was the singer—
May emotions as pure, as that song set a-stir
Be the worst that the future shall bring her.

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