Abraham Lincoln

(12 February 1809 – 15 April 1865 / Sinking Spring Farm, Kentucky)

Abraham Lincoln Quotes

  • ''The leading rule for the lawyer, as for the man of every other calling, is diligence. Leave nothing for to-morrow which can be done to-day.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Fragment, notes for a law lecture, July 1, 1850? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 81, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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  • ''Never stir up litigation. A worse man can scarcely be found than one who does this.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Fragment, notes for a law lecture, July 1, 1850? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 81, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''To [secure] to each labourer the whole product of his labour, or as nearly as possible, is a most worthy object of any good government.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. fragments of a tariff discussion, Dec. 1, 1847? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 412, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''The people themselves, and not their servants, can safely reverse their own deliberate decisions.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Message to Congress in special session, July 4, 1861. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 440, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''I would save the Union. I would save it the shortest way under the Constitution. The sooner the national authority can be restored; the nearer the Union will be "the Union as it was."''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Horace Greeley, Aug. 22, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 388, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''I have always thought that all men should be free; but if any should be slaves it should be first those who desire it for themselves, and secondly those who desire it for others. Whenever [I] hear anyone, arguing for slavery I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech to One Hundred Fortieth Indiana Regiment, Mar. 17, 1865. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 8, p. 361, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Yet in all our rejoicing let us neither express, nor cherish, any harsh feeling towards any citizen who, by his vote, has differed with us.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. remarks at Springfield, Illinois, Nov. 20, 1860. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 142, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Let not him who is houseless pull down the house of another; but let him labor diligently and build one for himself, thus by example assuring that his own shall be safe from violence when built.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. reply to the New York Workingmen's Democratic Republican Association, Mar. 21, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7, p. 259, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''I wish all men to be free. I wish the material prosperity of the already free which I feel sure the extinction of slavery would bring.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Henry W. Hoffman, Oct. 10, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 8, p. 41, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''I can and will pay it if it is right; but I don't wish to be "diddled!"''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to William M. Dickson, June 7, 1860. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 72, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).

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Best Poem of Abraham Lincoln

My Childhood Home I See Again

I

My childhood's home I see again,
And sadden with the view;
And still, as memory crowds my brain,
There's pleasure in it too.

O Memory! thou midway world
'Twixt earth and paradise,
Where things decayed and loved ones lost
In dreamy shadows rise,

And, freed from all that's earthly vile,
Seem hallowed, pure, and bright,
Like scenes in some enchanted isle
All bathed in liquid light.

As dusky mountains please the eye
When twilight chases day;
As bugle-tones that, passing by,
In distance die away;

As leaving ...

Read the full of My Childhood Home I See Again

The Bear Hunt

A wild-bear chace, didst never see?
Then hast thou lived in vain.
Thy richest bump of glorious glee,
Lies desert in thy brain.

When first my father settled here,
'Twas then the frontier line:
The panther's scream, filled night with fear
And bears preyed on the swine.

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