Abraham Lincoln

(12 February 1809 – 15 April 1865 / Sinking Spring Farm, Kentucky)

Abraham Lincoln Quotes

  • ''Military glory—the attractive rainbow that rises in showers of blood.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech, Jan. 12, 1848, to the House of Representatives. Arguing against the war with Mexico.
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  • ''I never did ask more, nor ever was willing to accept less, than for all the States, and the people thereof, to take and hold their places, and their rights, in the Union, under the Constitution of the United States. For this alone have I felt authorized to struggle; and I seek neither more nor less now.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to John A. McClernand, Jan. 8, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 48, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''In the present civil war it is quite possible that God's purpose is something different from the purpose of either party.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. meditation on the divine will, Sep. 2, 1862? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 403, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''What is conservatism? Is it not adherence to the old and tried, against the new and untried?''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech, Feb. 27, 1860, New York City. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, ed. Roy P. Basler (1953).
  • ''I am in no boastful mood. I shall not do more than I can, and I shall do all I can to save the government, which is my sworn duty as well as my personal inclination. I shall do nothing in malice. What I deal with is too vast for malicious dealing.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Cuthbert Bullitt, July 28, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 346, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Why should there not be a patient confidence in the ultimate justice of the people? Is there any better, or equal hope, in the world?''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. first inaugural address, Mar. 4, 1861. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 270, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''If you falter, and give up, you will lose the power of keeping any resolution, and will regret it all your life.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Quintin Campbell, June 28, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 288, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Fellow-citizens, we cannot escape history.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. annual message to Congress, Dec. 1, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 537, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''I have no purpose to introduce political and social equality between the white and black races. There is a physical difference between the two, which, in my judgement, will probably for ever forbid their living together upon the footing of perfect equality; and inasmuch as it becomes a necessity that there must be a difference, I ... am in favour of the race to which I belong having the superior position.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech, Aug. 21, 1858, Ottawa, Illinois. During his debates with Stephen A. Douglas for election to the Senate.
  • ''The strongest bond of human sympathy, outside of the family relation, should be one uniting all working people, of all nations, and tongues, and kindreds.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. reply to the New York Workingmen's Democratic Republican Association, Mar. 21, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7, p. 259, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).

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Best Poem of Abraham Lincoln

My Childhood Home I See Again

I

My childhood's home I see again,
And sadden with the view;
And still, as memory crowds my brain,
There's pleasure in it too.

O Memory! thou midway world
'Twixt earth and paradise,
Where things decayed and loved ones lost
In dreamy shadows rise,

And, freed from all that's earthly vile,
Seem hallowed, pure, and bright,
Like scenes in some enchanted isle
All bathed in liquid light.

As dusky mountains please the eye
When twilight chases day;
As bugle-tones that, passing by,
In distance die away;

As leaving ...

Read the full of My Childhood Home I See Again

To Rosa

You are young, and I am older;
You are hopeful, I am not -
Enjoy life, ere it grow colder -
Pluck the roses ere they rot.

Teach your beau to heed the lay -
That sunshine soon is lost in shade -
That now's as good as any day -
To take thee, Rosa, ere she fade.

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