Abraham Lincoln

(12 February 1809 – 15 April 1865 / Sinking Spring Farm, Kentucky)

Abraham Lincoln Quotes

  • ''Our common country is in great peril, demanding the loftiest views, and boldest action to bring it speedy relief.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Appeal to border state representatives to favor compensated emancipation (July 12, 1862). Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 319, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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  • ''Although what I am now to say is to be, in form, a reprimand, it is not intended to add a pang to what you have already suffered.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to James M. Cutts, Jr., Oct. 26, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 538, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''You have confidence in yourself, which is valuable, if not an indispensable quality.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Joseph Hooker, Jan. 26, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 78, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990). Preliminary words to calling a general on the carpet.
  • ''If there is ANY THING which it is the duty of the WHOLE PEOPLE to never entrust to any hands but their own, that thing is the preservation and perpetuity, of their own liberties, and institutions.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech at Peoria, Illinois, Oct. 16, 1854. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 270, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''You have constantly urged the idea that you were persecuted because you did not come from West-Point, and you repeat it in these letters. This, my dear general, is I fear, the rock on which you have split.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Robert H. Milroy, June 29, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 308, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Remembering that when not a very great man begins to be mentioned for a very great position, his head is very likely to be a little turned, I concluded I am not the fittest person to answer the questions you ask.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Richard M. Corwine, Apr. 6, 1860. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 36, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''I go for all sharing the privileges of the government, who assist in bearing its burthens.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to the editor of Sangamo Journal, June 13, 1836. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 48, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''It has long been a grave question whether any government, not too strong for the liberties of its people, can be strong enough to maintain its own existence, in great emergencies.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. response to a serenade, Nov. 10, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 8, p. 100, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Both parties deprecated war; but one of them would make war rather than let the nation survive; and the other would accept war rather than let it perish. And the war came.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. second inaugural address, Mar. 4, 1865. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 8, p. 332, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''When the white man governs himself that is self-government; but when he governs himself, and also governs another man, that is more than self-government—that is despotism.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech at Peoria, Illinois, Oct. 16, 1854. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 266, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).

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Best Poem of Abraham Lincoln

My Childhood Home I See Again

I

My childhood's home I see again,
And sadden with the view;
And still, as memory crowds my brain,
There's pleasure in it too.

O Memory! thou midway world
'Twixt earth and paradise,
Where things decayed and loved ones lost
In dreamy shadows rise,

And, freed from all that's earthly vile,
Seem hallowed, pure, and bright,
Like scenes in some enchanted isle
All bathed in liquid light.

As dusky mountains please the eye
When twilight chases day;
As bugle-tones that, passing by,
In distance die away;

As leaving ...

Read the full of My Childhood Home I See Again

To Rosa

You are young, and I am older;
You are hopeful, I am not -
Enjoy life, ere it grow colder -
Pluck the roses ere they rot.

Teach your beau to heed the lay -
That sunshine soon is lost in shade -
That now's as good as any day -
To take thee, Rosa, ere she fade.

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