Abraham Lincoln

(12 February 1809 – 15 April 1865 / Sinking Spring Farm, Kentucky)

Abraham Lincoln Quotes

  • ''It may be affirmed, without extravagance, that the free institutions we enjoy, have developed the powers, and improved the condition, of our whole people, beyond any example in the world.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Message to Congress in special session, July 4, 1861. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 437, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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  • ''The matter of fees is important, far beyond the mere question of bread and butter involved. Properly attended to, fuller justice is done to both lawyer and client.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Fragment, notes for a law lecture, July 1, 1850? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 81, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''I certainly know that if the war fails, the administration fails, and that I will be blamed for it, whether I deserve it or not. And I ought to be blamed, if I could do better. You think I could do better; therefore you blame me already. I think I could not do better; therefore I blame you for blaming me.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Carl Schurz, Nov. 24, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 509, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Thus let bygones be bygones. Let past differences, as nothing be.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech at a Republican banquet, Chicago, Illinois, Dec. 10, 1856. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 385, Rutgers University Press (1955, 1990).
  • ''Much is being said about peace; and no man desires peace more ardently than I. Still I am yet unprepared to give up the Union for a peace which, so achieved, could not be of much duration.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Isaac M. Schermerhorn, Sep. 12, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 8, p. 1, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''We have all heard of Young America. He is the most current youth of the age.
    Some think him conceited, and arrogant; but has he not reason to entertain a rather extensive opinion of himself? Is he not the inventor and owner of the present, and sole hope of the future?''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. second lecture on discoveries and inventions, Feb. 11, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 356, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''But let the past as nothing be. For the future my view is that the fight must go on.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Norman B. Judd, Nov. 15, 1858. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 336, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''I am glad I made the late race. It gave me a hearing on the great and durable question of the age, which I could have had in no other way; and though I now sink out of view, and shall be forgotten, I believe I have made some marks which will tell for the cause of civil liberty long after I am gone.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Anson G. Henry, Nov. 19, 1858. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 339, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''Let us have faith that right makes might, and in that faith, let us, to the end, dare to do our duty as we understand it.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. address at Cooper Institute, New York City, Feb. 27, 1860. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 550, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
  • ''In the hope that it may be no intrusion upon the sacredness of your sorrow, I have ventured to address you this tribute to the memory of my young friend, and your brave and early fallen child. May God give you that consolation which is beyond all earthly power.''
    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Ephraim D. and Phoebe Ellsworth, May 25, 1861. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 385, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).

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Best Poem of Abraham Lincoln

My Childhood Home I See Again

I

My childhood's home I see again,
And sadden with the view;
And still, as memory crowds my brain,
There's pleasure in it too.

O Memory! thou midway world
'Twixt earth and paradise,
Where things decayed and loved ones lost
In dreamy shadows rise,

And, freed from all that's earthly vile,
Seem hallowed, pure, and bright,
Like scenes in some enchanted isle
All bathed in liquid light.

As dusky mountains please the eye
When twilight chases day;
As bugle-tones that, passing by,
In distance die away;

As leaving ...

Read the full of My Childhood Home I See Again

To Linnie

A sweet plaintive song did I hear,
And I fancied that she was the singer—
May emotions as pure, as that song set a-stir
Be the worst that the future shall bring her.

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