Aeschylus

(525 BC - 455 BC / Eleusis)

Aeschylus Quotes

  • ''Know not to revere human things too much.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 146.
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  • ''The one knowing what is profitable, and not the man knowing many things, is wise.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 271.
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  • ''The man who does ill must suffer ill.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 267.
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  • ''Zeus is the air, Zeus the earth, Zeus all things and what transcends them all.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 295.
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  • ''A god implants in mortal guilt whenever he wants utterly to confound a house.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 151.
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  • ''Bronze in the mirror of the form, wine of the mind.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 274.
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  • ''For this is the mark of a wise and upright man, not to rail against the gods in misfortune.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 358.
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  • ''There is a moment when god honors falsehood.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 273.
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  • ''The words of truth are simple.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 162.
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  • ''Mourn for me rather as living than as dead.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 127.
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Best Poem of Aeschylus

The Sacrifice Of Iphigenia

Now long and long from wintry Strymon blew
The weary, hungry, anchor-straining blasts,
The winds that wandering seamen dearly rue,
Nor spared the cables worn and groaning masts;
And, lingering on, in indolent delay,
Slow wasted all the strength of Greece away.
But when the shrill-voiced prophet 'gan proclaim
That remedy more dismal and more dread
Than the drear weather blackening overhead,
And spoke in Artemis' most awful name,
The sons of Atreus, 'mid their armed peers,
Their sceptres dashed to earth, and each broke out in tears,
And thus the ...

Read the full of The Sacrifice Of Iphigenia

A Prayer For Artemis

STROPHE IV

Though Zeus plan all things right,
Yet is his heart's desire full hard to trace;
Nathless in every place
Brightly it gleameth, e'en in darkest night,
Fraught with black fate to man's speech-gifted race.

ANTISTROPHE IV

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